Diner – Mexicali Blues Cafe http://mexicalibluescafe.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:46:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Diner – Mexicali Blues Cafe http://mexicalibluescafe.com/ 32 32 ‘The Menu’ and its twisted ending, explained https://mexicalibluescafe.com/the-menu-and-its-twisted-ending-explained/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:05:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/the-menu-and-its-twisted-ending-explained/ As The menu, director Mark Mylod’s chilling send-off on the world of exclusive fine dining, raced to its dramatic end, something in my brain snapped. After almost two hours of being utterly terrified – Ralph Fiennes is cold and scary as chef Julian Slowik, an egomaniac driven to violence by his obsession with culinary perfection […]]]>

As The menu, director Mark Mylod’s chilling send-off on the world of exclusive fine dining, raced to its dramatic end, something in my brain snapped. After almost two hours of being utterly terrified – Ralph Fiennes is cold and scary as chef Julian Slowik, an egomaniac driven to violence by his obsession with culinary perfection at his restaurant Hawthorne – I started laughing uncontrollably . (Note: Major spoilers for the ending ahead.)

Finally, after torturing his guests and letting the woman he sexually harassed stab him in the leg, Chef Julian’s vision becomes painfully funny. As his diners watch in horror, kitchen workers artfully scatter the restaurant’s dining room with graham cracker crumbs and various sauces. And then, Julian sets the restaurant on fire as diners turn into human s’mores. Yes, s’mores. They gladly string marshmallows and pour chocolate over their heads, and everything ignites. When I first realized what was happening, I felt like I finally understood what The menu was approx. And now I’ll try to unzip the twisted end of The menu and why in fact in a way in fact works.

Why do the guests in the film willingly do this to each other?

The sheer chaos of this scene — who among us doesn’t want to see John Leguizamo and Judith Light turn into s’mores — is coupled with the absurdity that the diners almost willingly participate in their own deaths. Collectively, the guests trapped in Hawthorne never really try to defend themselves against Chief Julian or escape the island. After a few floury protests at the start of the meal, mainly “do you know who I am? variety, they accept their fate.

It seems the characters – all wealthy people who have rarely felt discomfort in their lives – are playing along because they just can’t figure out what’s happening to them. They’re automatons, moving from one lavish experience to the next, and Chef Julian’s intrigue has essentially failed them.

What is the movie trying to say by turning everyone into human s’mores?

After years of serving wealthy and privileged people, Julian would seek revenge in a particularly humiliating way: And is there anything more humiliating than having to prepare your body for consumption? After seeing these characters behave in the restaurant and learning about their indiscretions outside of it, The menu encourages us to encourage their disappearance. While you’re thinking, “Wow, he really turns those assholes into s’mores,” you’re also pretty excited to see what happens next. It seems like a pretty obvious consequence of living in a world where a few people can pay $1,000 to dine at a place like Hawthorne, while countless others wonder if they’ll dine at all.

Where the hell does such an idea come from?

According to Mylod, the dish itself is an emulation of chef Grant Achatz’s legendary table dessert at Alinea (which, for the record, involves no self-immolation). “When I joined the project, one of the big things I wanted to change about the script was to have this more lyrical ending,” Mylod told Eater. “We wanted to end this meal on a high, so we did a lot of research on how to make the specifics of the dessert elements work.”

Okay, but why s’mores and not baked Alaska?

This seems like an explicitly practical choice. It seems a lot harder to coat people in ice cream and meringue than just asking them to put on marshmallow costumes and pour chocolates over their heads. Realistically, though, it’s probably a send-up of food snobs who think s’mores suck.

Does this twist… really work?

It is certainly unexpected!!! For two whole hours, you really have no idea how this dinner is going to end. There are times when you almost feel like Margot – who turned out to be a sex worker and not a member of high society like the rest of the diners – could be the hero and figure out how to save everyone. . In a more traditional horror movie, you might expect every restaurant to be murdered in some way directly related to their bad behavior – maybe the tech brothers are killed by a computer or the womanizing politician is offended by a mistress. But Chef Julian’s decision to host a massive human bonfire feels both cinematic and restaurant-worthy. Don’t all chefs want to end the evening with the perfect dessert?

What’s wrong with Margot’s burger?

Before escaping the island on a boat, Margot asks Chef Julian to make her a cheeseburger, giving the audience a little insight into the human behind the monster. Julian smiles and lets Margot go. She boards the boat with a doggy bag containing half of that cheeseburger, and the last thing we see is Margot taking a big bite out of the burger as she watches Hawthorne burn to the ground from a safe distance. But she hears a faint knock just like Chef Julian’s as she bites into the burger, which could indicate he’s done something sinister to his survival snack.

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“Insane” Dinner Parties – Diary – DAWN.COM https://mexicalibluescafe.com/insane-dinner-parties-diary-dawn-com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 02:30:20 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/insane-dinner-parties-diary-dawn-com/ Most fancy restaurants in Pakistan just don’t care about their customers. Either they offer tasteless dishes or they serve an insufficient amount while charging a huge sum. The money earned by deceiving customers is then used to deceive even more potential customers through advertising. Restaurant owners are using the power of social media and hiring […]]]>

Most fancy restaurants in Pakistan just don’t care about their customers. Either they offer tasteless dishes or they serve an insufficient amount while charging a huge sum. The money earned by deceiving customers is then used to deceive even more potential customers through advertising. Restaurant owners are using the power of social media and hiring influencers to post fake reviews for their promotion. These influencers write beautiful paragraphs filled with lies and throw dust in people’s eyes.

I live in Karachi and have had several bad experiences at some of the more popular restaurants. In one of the restaurants I was charged 15,000 rupees for stale and tasteless food. In another famous restaurant, the quantity was not even enough for one person. I don’t understand why these restaurants offer poor quality and quantity of food when they charge so much to customers.

Guests should be vigilant. They must not fall for these fake reviews and appealing vibe. As social media has become a platform to spread deception, it is better to believe word of mouth and save others by posting honest reviews.

Maisa Khan
Karachi

Posted in Dawn, November 21, 2022

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This drive-in restaurant in Iowa has been open since the 1950s https://mexicalibluescafe.com/this-drive-in-restaurant-in-iowa-has-been-open-since-the-1950s/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 15:06:01 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/this-drive-in-restaurant-in-iowa-has-been-open-since-the-1950s/ Old-school drive-in is far from dead in Iowa, and heading to Fort Dodge will discover one of the best there. The Tom Thumb Drive-In has been running since the 1950s, with some regulars proudly announcing that they’ve been going there for half a century or more. But unlike so many […]]]>




Old-school drive-in is far from dead in Iowa, and heading to Fort Dodge will discover one of the best there. The Tom Thumb Drive-In has been running since the 1950s, with some regulars proudly announcing that they’ve been going there for half a century or more. But unlike so many similar places, this Iowa drive-in restaurant isn’t just about car traffic. It actually doubles as a small restaurant, allowing people to dine in a lovely old school setting. The surprisingly extensive menu features retro comfort food that sometimes feels like it hasn’t changed since the 1950s – but that’s part of the charm! So get in the car, order, and step back in time at this one-of-a-kind Iowa restaurant.

Have you been to the Tom Thumb Drive-In in Fort Dodge? Let us know all about your trip to this old-school Iowa drive-in restaurant in the comments section. If you plan to visit, you can check out their latest promotions on their Facebook page. For another drive-in classic, check out this recently reopened classic.

Address: Tom Thumb Drive In, 1412 A St W, Fort Dodge, IA 50501, USA

OnlyInYourState may earn compensation through affiliate links in this article.

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MOVIE REVIEW: “The Banshees of Inisherin” https://mexicalibluescafe.com/movie-review-the-banshees-of-inisherin/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:01:51 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/movie-review-the-banshees-of-inisherin/ See “The Banshees of Inisherin” because the Wild Atlantic Way is truly God’s Country. Of course, I’m talking about the west coast of Ireland. In “The Banshees of Inisherin”, Irish playwright and filmmaker Martin McDonagh offers us the enchanting countryside of his childhood. While Inisherin is a fictional place, the word “inish” is Irish for […]]]>

See “The Banshees of Inisherin” because the Wild Atlantic Way is truly God’s Country. Of course, I’m talking about the west coast of Ireland. In “The Banshees of Inisherin”, Irish playwright and filmmaker Martin McDonagh offers us the enchanting countryside of his childhood.

While Inisherin is a fictional place, the word “inish” is Irish for “island”. And ‘The Banshees of Inisherin’ was filmed primarily in two locations: on Inishmore, the largest of the Aran Islands in Galway Bay, and on Achill Island off County Mayo.

Like most of the west coast of Ireland, Inishmore and Achill Island are rugged, breathtaking and off the beaten track. Inisherin is no different.

In this fictional community, the year is 1923, towards the end of the real Irish Civil War. Brendan Gleeson is Colm and Colin Farrell plays Padraic. The viewer has no idea how long the two were friends; all we know is that Colm wants to end their friendship.

Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson in ‘The Banshees of Inisherin’. Photo courtesy of Searchlight Pictures.

The story that unfolds in “The Banshees of Inisherin” is inspired by life on a small island, and therefore a certain degree of isolation and loneliness. But the reason Colm gives for wanting to cancel Padraic is simple: Colm thinks Padraic is boring. Although you never hear an Irishman accuse another Irishman of being a nudnik, that is exactly what Colm does.

The story arc takes a tragicomic turn when Padraic is unwilling or unable to honor Colm’s wish to end things. For one thing, it’s completely unknown if Padraic has any other friends besides his sister Siobhán, the police chief’s son Dominic, and a miniature donkey named Jenny.

On the other hand, Colm is eager to leave a lasting mark on the world. He wants to devote the time he has left to composing and playing music. Indeed, breaking up is hard to do. We know Colm’s desperation is real, but again, we never know exactly why he feels this way in the first place.

No matter. According to Irish legend, a banshee is a female spirit that announces death; its moans warn a home or family of impending death. Between Mrs. McCormick, that’s all I can say.

At the end of 2018, I stayed several nights in Inishmore and walked for miles between stone walls, fields and the Dun Aonghasa by day. Wild is the wind from Galway Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. In fact, my departure from Inishmore was delayed due to Storm Callum.

Cliffs on the coast of the Irish island of Inishmore. Photo by Sarah Wright.

I always think of the main themes of “The Banshees of Inishmore”. I saw this movie last weekend in Connecticut, a few hours before meeting my mom and stepdad for dinner. They had seen it a few days before and were eager to talk about it.

Immediately after my matinee movie experience, I headed to the Celtic Cavern in Middletown, Connecticut, and lifted a pint of Guinness. The next morning I ate at O’Rourke’s Diner on Main Street. My reaction to “The Banshees of Inisherin” is perhaps best summed up by what hangs just inside the door at O’Rourke’s:

Words found just inside the door of O’Rourke’s Diner on Main Street in Middletown, Conn. Photo by Sarah Wright.

‘The Banshees of Inisherin’ plays at the Triplex Cinema in Great Barrington and the Moviehouse in Millerton. It opens at Images Cinema in Williamstown this Friday.

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Giant turkey to local diners: forgive all the Toms for “Thank you Vegan” https://mexicalibluescafe.com/giant-turkey-to-local-diners-forgive-all-the-toms-for-thank-you-vegan/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 20:48:23 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/giant-turkey-to-local-diners-forgive-all-the-toms-for-thank-you-vegan/ For immediate release:November 11, 2022 Contact:Lauren Kent 202-483-7382 Montgomery, Ala. – On the heels of Gov. Kay Ivey’s turkey “pardon” yesterday, PETA encourages everyone to follow suit in a can’t-miss post that just passed by restaurants serving turkey on the Interstate Freeway. Atlanta. As part of PETA’s nationwide campaign urging people to celebrate “ThanksVegan” by […]]]>

For immediate release:
November 11, 2022

Contact:
Lauren Kent 202-483-7382

Montgomery, Ala. – On the heels of Gov. Kay Ivey’s turkey “pardon” yesterday, PETA encourages everyone to follow suit in a can’t-miss post that just passed by restaurants serving turkey on the Interstate Freeway. Atlanta.

As part of PETA’s nationwide campaign urging people to celebrate “ThanksVegan” by leaving turkeys alone, the billboard follows news that 12 former workers at Plainville Farms, a self-proclaimed “humane” turkey supplier, have recently charged with over 140 counts of animal cruelty after a secret PETA investigationcruelty to animals one of the many reasons, along with health and the environment, why people are opting for tasty, animal-free meals this year.

“Apologies should be given to everyone who ate once but decided to stop eating these sweet people, who feel pain and fear and deserve to enjoy their life as a turkey,” said the president of PETA, Ingrid Newkirk. “PETA encourages everyone to take personal responsibility to ‘forgive Tom,’ and we have free recipes to help people get started.”

Turkeys raised for food are normally slaughtered when they are between 14 and 18 weeks old, and more than 45 million turkeys are killed each year for Thanksgiving alone. Workers hang young birds upside down, drag them into an electrified bath, slit their throats and throw them into boiling water in feather tanks, often while they are still conscious. In addition to saving nearly 200 animals a year from enduring daily suffering and terrifying death, everyone who goes vegan reduces their carbon footprint and lowers their risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and more. ailments.

PETA’s ThanksVegan Guide is packed with recipes, cooking tips, lists of the best meatless hearty roasts, and everything you need to have a delicious turkey holiday.

PETA’s billboard is located at 6050 Atlanta Hwy.just down the road from Jim ‘N Nick’s, Wishbone Cafe, Martha’s Place Buffet and Catering, and a host of other restaurants and grocery stores selling turkey.

PETA — whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to eat” — opposes speciesism, a human supremacist worldview. For more information, please visit PETA.org or follow the group on Twitter, FacebookWhere instagram.

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McDonald’s ‘Burger Salad’ hack divides diners https://mexicalibluescafe.com/mcdonalds-burger-salad-hack-divides-diners/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 22:43:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/mcdonalds-burger-salad-hack-divides-diners/ The meal made famous by dietitian Dr Robert Atkins — the no-bun burger — is trending again on TikTok, but for all the wrong reasons. TikTok user Amber Rae uploaded a clip that left salad lovers and bread lovers alike confused when she turned a cheeseburger into a “burger salad”. “It’s a burger salad and […]]]>

The meal made famous by dietitian Dr Robert Atkins — the no-bun burger — is trending again on TikTok, but for all the wrong reasons.

TikTok user Amber Rae uploaded a clip that left salad lovers and bread lovers alike confused when she turned a cheeseburger into a “burger salad”.

“It’s a burger salad and it’s so good don’t judge me,” she wrote of the images with over 143,300 views.

In the 15-second video, she showed off her burger salad, which consisted of a half-pound ground beef and cheese patty, with extra lettuce and tomatoes, and no onions or buns, all wrapped up in a plastic take-out box.

Rae, pleased with herself, wrote: “When McDonald’s girl said she made it with love.”

Many users were envious of her leafy meal, specifically asking how she managed to land the order when McDonald’s would have stopped selling salads in 2021. Rae had asked for “a fancy quarter pound, no bun, add extra lettuce and it became a salad”. she claimed, adding that with a large latte, her total was around $11.

She shared her order with TikTok, which was asking people for the recipe.
@amber_rae55/Tiktok

Some were thrilled with the hack, while those probably too young to remember the Atkins diet lamented the concept.

“It made me physically sick,” wrote one viewer. Another troubled witness reflected on the “amount of mayonnaise” on the salad.

In the comments, Rae confirmed that she worked at McDonald’s, which is how she may have known about the handy trick.

“The possibilities are, sadly, endless,” she joked in a comment.

The Post has contacted McDonald’s for comment.

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Two stores make the jump from the West End Diner starting space to Uptown Marion https://mexicalibluescafe.com/two-stores-make-the-jump-from-the-west-end-diner-starting-space-to-uptown-marion/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 22:02:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/two-stores-make-the-jump-from-the-west-end-diner-starting-space-to-uptown-marion/ CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (KCRG) – Dreams have come true for several local business owners in Marion. The 800 square foot commercial spaces have turned into even bigger opportunities for two companies over the past week. Karlee Peters started The Purple Wagon with her roommate while she was still in college. Eventually her mother came on […]]]>

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (KCRG) – Dreams have come true for several local business owners in Marion. The 800 square foot commercial spaces have turned into even bigger opportunities for two companies over the past week.

Karlee Peters started The Purple Wagon with her roommate while she was still in college. Eventually her mother came on board to make baby bows. Now they are co-owners of the baby shop which opened its first physical location in West End stores in Marion.

“It was huge for our local community to be able to come and shop in person. We could try new products there,” Peters explained.

The West End Diner owner bought the property in 2019 with the dream of opening a restaurant and creating space for other businesses to flourish. There are now six stores on the property.

“I loved the idea of ​​especially supporting the women in this project, their passion project and helping to make their dreams come true,” said Annette Perry, owner of West End Diner.

And it worked. Staged Dwellings was based in the West End until last Saturday when it was able to open a brick and mortar in Uptown Marion.

“Looking back to start in my basement in my little shop in West End, my business growth has increased and how much I appreciate Annette for giving me the opportunity there,” said Keri Dahl, owner of Staged Lodgings.

She is not alone. The Purple Wagon is keeping its store in West End, but it’s having a grand opening this Saturday for a brick and mortar in Uptown.

“We had a soft opening last night so the outpouring there was huge, it makes me want to cry. Our kids are going to grow up here, they love being here already,” Peters said.

Watching businesses grow alongside his restaurant and take the leap is a dream come true for Perry.

“It’s a bit like when my eldest daughter went to university. You’re so proud of her but you cry for three months, you can’t go to the bedroom. I was so proud of them, I was so happy to be part of this journey,” Perry said.

And a new business has already filled its open space, the Jack opened this week. It is the West End’s first men’s store.

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Do social networks influence diners more than Michelin stars? https://mexicalibluescafe.com/do-social-networks-influence-diners-more-than-michelin-stars/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 06:22:38 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/do-social-networks-influence-diners-more-than-michelin-stars/ Over the summer I traveled to Spain with my wife and son. Between overflowing plates of Iberian ham and a few too many Aperol Spritz, we made it a point to visit the country’s cuisine mecca, San Sebastian. Our only goal: to eat at Mugaritz, a restaurant with two Michelin stars. As my wife and […]]]>

Over the summer I traveled to Spain with my wife and son.

Between overflowing plates of Iberian ham and a few too many Aperol Spritz, we made it a point to visit the country’s cuisine mecca, San Sebastian. Our only goal: to eat at Mugaritz, a restaurant with two Michelin stars.

As my wife and I devoured crawfish and sake tissues (don’t ask), we wondered if our son would one day embark on his own Michelin-inspired journey, joining the crowd of enthusiasts who have made the Michelin Guide the benchmark in fine products. to eat.

Or would the guide, with its examination of more than 15,000 restaurants in 35 territories, then fall prey to the disruption that has toppled so many race keepers?

As with so many forms of modern culture – from music to books to film – the challenge could very well come from TikTok.

The short-form video app now has over a billion users. In America, 100 million people scroll through TikTok’s incredibly efficient recommendation algorithm and spend an average of 80 minutes a day on the app, “more than the time spent on Facebook and Instagram, combined” according to the Washington Post.

Meanwhile, TikTok’s video editing tools, quick 45-60 second dopamine hits, and full-screen visuals are tailor-made for the food.

“Searching for food on TikTok brings an experience you won’t find anywhere else on the internet,” says Danny Kim, a TikTok food influencer with 3.7 million followers on his handle @DannyGrubs. “Google and Yelp don’t show the full experience like walking into a restaurant and seeing the food come out in real time.”

Kim was previously an engineer, but turned to food media after her blog took off on the DC (Eat the Capital) food scene. Over the past year, he’s gone viral several times by issuing short chef challenges like “can you make a gourmet meal out of McDonald’s chicken nuggets?”

In a phone conversation, Kim tells me that these digital views turn into real foot traffic and that TikTok is the #1 converter for restaurants. The app attracts more people than Instagram, which is very popular with food influencers.

The TikTok-to-restaurant trend is hardly anecdotal. In June, a Google official said that “nearly 40% of young people, when they’re looking for a place to have lunch, they don’t go to Google Maps or search… they go to TikTok or Instagram.”

And short videos are now ubiquitous, with TikTok clones everywhere, from Instagram reels to YouTube shorts to Snap Spotlight (those apps would really take off if there were a US ban on Chinese-owned TikTok).

“I think Gen Z just prefers visual search,” says Turner Novak, a venture capitalist who is the founder of Banana Capital and writes The Split newsletter. “You see it in TikTok’s engagement, which has gotten to the point where Google is rolling out more visual search tools to mimic TikTok’s For You page.”

As the younger generation increasingly turn to TikTok for food recommendations, could Michelin become the culinary equivalent of the Oscars or Emmy Awards: one-off arbiters of excellence that lose relevance?

I posed this question to Ben Liebmann, former general manager of Noma, the 3-star Michelin restaurant founded by Danish chef superstar Rene Redzepi.

Liebmann listed the many threats to Michelin’s influence since the turn of the century:

  • The World’s 50 Best Restaurants: Launched in 2002 by British media company William Reed Ltd., the brand surveys more than 1,000 food experts and then ranks the world’s restaurants from 1 to 50.
  • Chef’s table: The streaming show launched on Netflix in 2015, catapulting the chefs it featured to star status and boosting restaurant traffic (a boost in popularity usually reserved for recipients of new Michelin stars)
  • Instagram: The photo-sharing app was acquired by Facebook in 2012 and — with its glossy aesthetic — was social media canon for restaurants before TikTok (Liebmann says Instagram remains by far the most important social channel in Name)

TikTok’s food recommendations are the latest upstart, but Michelin’s reputation — built around a system of anonymous inspectors and rigorous review guidelines — is still set high, according to Liebmann.

“I don’t think Michelin is going anywhere,” says Liebmann, who now runs Understory, a media consultancy and production company. “Does he need to redefine himself for a new generation? Or migrate its content and tell its stories on new platforms or new media? There are absolutely opportunities there. If you put aside what one thinks of the guide and the star-studded review, the brand still stands for something.

What do TikTok natives think of Michelin?

Kim (AKA @DannyGrubs) wants to know more about the star award process and feels that anonymous detectives are the polar opposite of an individual speaking directly to the camera. The latter puts authenticity first, which is very important to Gen-Z audiences. The founder of Eat the Capital nevertheless pays tribute to Michelin.

“One thing about Michelin, you’ll usually have a good dining experience,” says Kim. “It will be safe and there will be a standard that will be maintained for cleanliness and the chef will be on top.”

As a nod to the star-rating system, a few of @DannyGrubs’ challenges ask chefs to make a “Michelin-level” soup or dish with just $10 worth of ingredients.

Does Michelin even need a TikTok strategy?

Liebmann does not think so. To remain relevant in the decades to come, Michelin should not jump onto new platforms, but rather redouble its efforts on its original mission: to solve the question of where to go to eat.

Of course, the original Michelin Guide was founded to take French motorists around the continent in search of good food while driving on Michelin tires (the origin story has also become an incredible meme).

But in terms of global coverage, it’s still early days: the Guide didn’t even launch in America until 2005 before adding other major non-European economies in 2007 (Japan) and 2017 (China). And as my fellow columnist Bobby Ghosh recently noted, he’s only just arrived in Istanbul.

Although Michelin is now present online, the brand’s flagship products remain physical guides (over 30 million lifetime sales) and live events to reveal star ratings.

In recent years, tourist boards have paid for the platinum brand Michelin to launch a guide for their towns (to be clear, it’s just for the inspectors to show up). According to Eater, the South Korean tourism board paid Michelin $1.8 million to launch a guide to Seoul in 2016 and the Thai government paid $4.4 million over five years, starting with Bangkok in 2017.

A report by Ernst & Young suggests that this money is well spent: 71% of frequent flyers would “increase their spending if there was a Michelin Guide selection”.

As fate would have it, the newest to receive Michelin stars is much closer to me than Spain. In fact, that’s where I live: Vancouver (which also has a good supply of Aperol Spritzes). So keep your eyes peeled for a brief 30 second video describing my first Michelin meal in my hometown.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners. The column is by writer Trung Phan.

Read also | Meet the chef who earned the Trèsind Studio a Michelin star

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This restaurant charged €250 to a dinner for cancellation. Was it the right thing to do? – The Irish Times https://mexicalibluescafe.com/this-restaurant-charged-e250-to-a-dinner-for-cancellation-was-it-the-right-thing-to-do-the-irish-times/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 05:02:42 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/this-restaurant-charged-e250-to-a-dinner-for-cancellation-was-it-the-right-thing-to-do-the-irish-times/ Paul and Helen McDonald, owners of Bastion, the Michelin-starred restaurant in the town of Kinsale, County Cork, woke up one recent morning to a one-star review on TripAdvisor. He had been let in by a diner who had phoned to cancel his reservation less than an hour before he was due to eat in the […]]]>

Paul and Helen McDonald, owners of Bastion, the Michelin-starred restaurant in the town of Kinsale, County Cork, woke up one recent morning to a one-star review on TripAdvisor. He had been let in by a diner who had phoned to cancel his reservation less than an hour before he was due to eat in the 12-seat restaurant.

The restaurant said they were in the emergency room with their daughter, awaiting test results to determine the severity of an injury. But their credit card was immediately charged €250, the full price of the menu for two people, in accordance with Bastion’s cancellation policy. The restaurant posted the negative review due to what they viewed as the restaurant’s lack of understanding.

Bastion’s response on TripAdvisor went largely unnoticed until it was picked up by a local newspaper. A slew of negative reviews followed (TripAdvisor has since removed them), prompting the McDonalds to explain its policy on Twitter.

The restaurant does not wish to discuss the incident further, but confirms that it stands by its review. The charge on their credit card was refunded when they phoned Bastion with the details of the gift voucher they intended to use that evening, which was then taken as payment for the no-show .

For Paul McDonald, the problem was that the food for 12 diners had already been purchased and prepared, and it was too late to fill the table – a €130 10-course tasting menu is not a last-minute decision , and many of their customers travel from Dublin and elsewhere in Ireland.

With enough notice, he says, Bastion was usually able to fill the tables on his waiting list. But if a reservation is canceled at short notice, moving the reservation to another date is not an option. With staffing issues causing them to work at reduced capacity, they do a single 12-guest session four nights a week. McDonald’s says 12 is their break-even point.

“If someone says, ‘Oh, I’m going to book next week instead. Is that OK?’ next week will be full anyway. It’s here and now that we worry,” McDonald says. “And, you know, everybody’s reason is the best reason, but none of them make any difference when I’m sitting staring at an empty chair. And as cold as that sounds – I know, I get it, it’s cold and heartless – that’s where we are right now. It’s hard.”

No-shows and last-minute cancellations are among the top complaints from restaurateurs, especially in the run-up to Christmas, and many have deterrents in place because a missed reservation is a missed income.. Yet other restaurants are hesitant to endorse the sentiments expressed by the owner of Bastion. Lignum, a destination fine dining restaurant in Bullaun, Co Galway, has a 24 hour cancellation policy, but discretion is applied.

“We don’t want to charge people, but sometimes we do,” explains its chef and owner, Danny Africano. “If it’s a case of something happening, the first thing we do is ask, ‘Do you want to change the date of your reservation?’ We don’t charge automatically. We’d like them to come back. Because if you blame someone, they’re not really coming back in a good frame of mind.

At Liath, the two-star Michelin restaurant in Blackrock, Co Dublin, full payment for the €170 tasting menu is charged at the time of booking, which seems to favor the restaurateur over the diner. Damien Grey, the chef and owner, says that over the years he’s learned to sniff out a spoofer, but when it’s a real emergency, like a sick child, that’s a different matter.

“That’s where your human compassion comes in, and that’s when you really have to weigh the options,” he says. “Bad publicity? Or did you just bite the bullet? Take it for what it is. I think it literally comes down to the authenticity of the person. When something like this happens, all you have to do is to say, ‘I’m really, really sorry. Can we do anything for you? Don’t worry about the booking. Just sort your kid’ – or your sibling, or your mom, or your dad, or anything else – ‘and come back to us. We’ll sort this out later.

“Deposits are a great system if you’re fair in how you work them and are willing to repay at a reasonable price,” he says. “You can’t use a reservation system and just say to yourself, ‘No, that’s it. Good luck. Thank you very much.’ Because it will just hurt you. It will definitely hurt you, because one person is talking to 10 people, 10 people are talking to 100 people.

It’s not just starred and fine-dining restaurants that apply a penalty for last-minute cancellations or no-shows. Increasingly, mid-priced restaurants are using the same tactic, with nominal fees per diner.

Overall, you have to be able to do something to guarantee that people will come. You rely on it. Twenty euros, I think, is a small token

“I think a lot of people have trouble entering their credit card details” when booking a table online, says Morgan VanderKamer, who owns and runs Union Wine Bar & Kitchen, in Waterford, with her partner, Stephen. McArdle. “We don’t charge anything – only if they don’t show up. Life is going to happen. Sometimes people are going to have to cancel. But I think overall you have to be able to do something to ensure that people will come. You count on it. Twenty euros I think, it’s a small token. When it’s for a group reservation, it’s a bit different, because once you have the food for a group of 20 or 30 people, you’ve already ordered it, it happens, so that’s all you have left.

VanderKamer says they haven’t charged any customers for last-minute cancellations or no-shows and hopes that won’t become necessary. “People called us at the last minute, and you can hear in their voices that something happened. You can’t question it,” she says. “What do you do? You just have to deal with it. And you know that at some point they’ll come back. This stuff happens. You know when there’s truth and you know when there isn’t. there is not any.

So what should diners do to ensure they are fair to the restaurant, but also not to risk losing money on a reservation when a situation arises?

As a general rule, after you have made an online reservation with your credit card details, you can cancel free of charge up to 48 hours before the time your table is reserved – this usually varies from 24 to 72 hours in advance. If you exceed this time, the restaurant will charge a per person fee to your credit card – in some cases, such as restaurants with a limited number of tables, the fee may be the full cost of the meal. It is therefore worth checking the rules before checking the box online to say that you accept them.

If you can’t make a reservation, just try to work with the restaurant. And the same for restaurants. Working with bloody clients. ‘Cause they’re your bread and butter

“Be sure to read the terms and conditions that restaurants using a deposit system have in place. Because it’s legal there,” Gray says. “Second, if you can’t make a reservation, give them adequate notice. Each restaurant will refund you if you give them enough notice. Make sure if you have a problem, or if you have a problem, to reach out. Restaurants are more than happy to work with people. They want the business. They want you to come, even if you postpone the reservation to another date. Just try to work with the restaurant. And the same for restaurants. Working with bloody clients. Because they are your bread and butter. And if you don’t want to pay a deposit, don’t go to a restaurant. It’s that simple.”

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How political unrest and COVID led to these beautiful images of diners https://mexicalibluescafe.com/how-political-unrest-and-covid-led-to-these-beautiful-images-of-diners/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 15:00:24 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/how-political-unrest-and-covid-led-to-these-beautiful-images-of-diners/ What do you hope people take away from this series? I think the photographs are quite open, and I like that. I just did an MFA, and I was honestly quite bullied by the fact that my work wasn’t super well accepted in school, so I’m really sick of the work that you have to […]]]>

What do you hope people take away from this series?

I think the photographs are quite open, and I like that. I just did an MFA, and I was honestly quite bullied by the fact that my work wasn’t super well accepted in school, so I’m really sick of the work that you have to know what the artist intended or it doesn’t make sense. Or a work that you have to read a lot of critical theory to understand.

I love the fact that, on the one hand, the people in the towns I photographed seemed to enjoy the work. They write me on Instagram or came to my recent show. So in that case, maybe they’re just removing [that it’s a beautiful photograph] Where It’s somewhere my grandfather goes after his doctor’s appointment. I have heard that. It’s a place that’s familiar to me. Anything people take out of a photo is okay. I heard that the idea of ​​a kind of sadness and division came without even reading my artist statement.

I would love for us all to try to find a way to get along. I don’t know how it works. It looks like the system is down right now. When I was doing this work, I was trying to look very closely at this American myth and think deeply about it. I feel like if we all take a closer look, is there any common ground we can find? I don’t know, and it’s super difficult, and there are some topics that I don’t think there’s common ground on, and there shouldn’t be – but let’s -U.S ? How are we going to move forward as a country? I don’t know, so I was trying to explore that with these images, and I hope people will think a little more.

What did you learn while shooting this series?

When I was doing the work, I started getting really scared at times because of the signage around certain political and other ideologies. Things that I encountered in certain cities, I felt deeply upset or frustrated or angry or scared, anxious, confused… all these things when I came across these violent slogans. My husband often drives me, and he stopped wanting to go out into the world and drive me around because he would be very upset too.

So part of it was trying not to instantly judge a place or a person based on how they looked or what I expected. Don’t expect something negative all the time. It’s difficult. I was really worried about what happened to me during the Trump era, how I sometimes saw someone and judged them, that they might have certain political beliefs, and I don’t think that helps to anyone. So going to all these little towns and going to so many places in Pennsylvania, which is a big swing state. And you can go to a place where Donald Trump had been the day before. I found that scary. I try to have a more open mind and not judge someone before talking to them. It was the most basic thing [I learned].

How has working as a waiter from time to time influenced your perspective?

I photographed what are called “third spaces”, spaces where we find ourselves outside of home and work, which were mainly diners and restaurants. I’ve been a waitress on and off for 17 years, so I was thinking how very aware I am of having an income that depends on tips, and that really changes from day to day, and how much that can being precarious and how many of us here live that way.

So I thought about it during the pandemic because I lived that way myself. I was thinking about the spaces themselves and who worked there, or who had worked there, because a lot of those places have closed since I photographed them. The restaurant world is personal to me as a place where most of the work we see is done by women. Of course, there are men and women in the kitchen, but more often than not, the one who greets you, especially in a restaurant, will be a woman.

How does color play a role in your work?

I love the color so much, and I think it’s a strong element. [For previous day jobs,] I’ve spent years looking at color in photography to see how it would print in a magazine, and so I think I’m really drawn to that when I’m doing work. But also, like I was saying, I was kind of really dealing with this kind of frustration of this us versus them mentality that seems to be happening and all the fear and anger and anxiety that I was feeling. I tend to shoot in the golden hour, so I harnessed that light to kind of capture an element of joy in sometimes quite complicated environments. I was talking to a curator and I said something like this, and he said, “Oh, so you made your friend light? I guess it’s true, a certain color of light, the warm light at golden hour, is soothing and makes me happy. So if I was out there and slightly scared or upset or confused, that would be something very personal to me, and it would be an experience for me that would hopefully come back into the work.

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