Mexican Food – Mexicali Blues Cafe http://mexicalibluescafe.com/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 18:14:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Mexican Food – Mexicali Blues Cafe http://mexicalibluescafe.com/ 32 32 Taco-Tastic, chef Victoria Elizondo’s first book, comes out in October https://mexicalibluescafe.com/taco-tastic-chef-victoria-elizondos-first-book-comes-out-in-october/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 16:29:10 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/taco-tastic-chef-victoria-elizondos-first-book-comes-out-in-october/ If there’s a taco expert in Houstonthis is Victoria Elizondo, the 31-year-old Mexican chef behind the popular East End restaurant Cochinita & Co.which opened in Kickin’ Kombucha in early 2021. While Elizondo has spent the past year dazzling local foodies with its inspired, authentic and delicious Mexican cuisine through dishes like its […]]]>



If there’s a taco expert in Houstonthis is Victoria Elizondo, the 31-year-old Mexican chef behind the popular East End restaurant Cochinita & Co.which opened in Kickin’ Kombucha in early 2021. While Elizondo has spent the past year dazzling local foodies with its inspired, authentic and delicious Mexican cuisine through dishes like its mushroom tinga tacos, tacos tacos almendrado mole and pibil tacos, this fall she’ll dazzle readers in the US and across the pond with her new cookbook on, you guessed it, tacos.

Taco-Tastic, a taco-centric cookbook she just finished writing for UK publishing group Wellbeck, comes out Oct. 25, and Elizondo couldn’t be prouder. “That’s a lot,” she says of the book, which features more than 60 taco recipes. While the book’s title and theme existed long before Elizondo became involved in the project, the publishing house responsible for it lacked the book’s most essential ingredient: a leader to implement the idea. By chance, Elizondo was connected to the publishing group through a Houston-based photographer, and the group decided to sign Elizondo for the project.




Although the new book has been in the works for over a year, Elizondo only got the final green light to start writing it four months ago, so finishing the book on time was a feat of endurance. for her and the local food photographer she partnered with for the project.

So what’s in the book? Fans of Elizondo’s cuisine at Cochinita & Co. will be delighted to hear that authentic tacos are making an appearance in the project. But while Houston is a city brimming with global ingredients, Elizondo acknowledges that isn’t the case everywhere, and the publisher wanted the book to appeal to the average home cook, whether a suburban soccer mom in Michigan or an urban professional. in London. “They wanted the book to appeal to a lot of people,” Elizondo says. “They wanted the recipes to be easy to make and the ingredients to be easy to find.”

So while the book includes authentic recipes like barbacoa, it also includes less authentic but delicious-sounding tacos, like one built from purple yams and vegan chorizo, another made from quinoa and sweet potatoes, and a tuna tostada with sesame seeds. The 176-page taco tome is divided into eight chapters covering everything from salsas and sides to breakfast tacos and vegetarian and vegan options. Those who want to pick it up before its release date can pre-order the book from various national retailers, but why not celebrate a local chef by ordering a copy from Brazos Bookstore and keep your dollars in the community? That is, if you haven’t reserved all of your discretionary expenses for another visit to Cochinita & Co.

]]>
Thank you forever, Diana Kennedy, for helping preserve traditional Mexican cuisine https://mexicalibluescafe.com/thank-you-forever-diana-kennedy-for-helping-preserve-traditional-mexican-cuisine/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 18:52:44 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/thank-you-forever-diana-kennedy-for-helping-preserve-traditional-mexican-cuisine/ ZITACUARO, MEXICO – June 23: Diana Kennedy is an author and authority on Mexican cuisine. a native … [+] from the United Kingdom, she began traveling to Mexico in 1957 with her husband, Paul Kennedy, a New York Times correspondent. Here shopping at a market near her home June 23, 1990 Zitacuaro, Michoacan, Mexico (Photo […]]]>

I was saddened to learn that Diana Kennedy, the foremost authority on traditional Mexican cuisine and published foodways in English, passed away on July 24 at the age of 99. She always said she would live to be 100. live forever.

Her first cookbook The cuisines of Mexico, had just celebrated its 50th anniversary in June, having sold some 100,000 copies and widely credited with expanding the global understanding of traditional Mexican cuisine. Yet, throughout social media, people (probably not Mexican) were quick to label her a neo-colonialist and accuse her of cultural appropriation. Let me clear it up for you.

Diana loved Mexico and fiercely defended our cuisine and our environment. She has produced nine published cookbooks, filled with recipes carefully selected by traditional Mexican cooks from all 32 states. Independent through and through, she drove her shitty van and traveled alone across the country, from the seaside to the sierras, to ensure that even the smallest town’s recipes and ingredients were recognized and preserved.

She tirelessly detailed endemic edible plants, their flavors and their culinary uses, in a way neither botanists nor Mexican chefs ever did. Without his work, many of these age-old ingredients and recipes would be lost forever. For her work, she received the honors of the Order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest honor given by the Mexican government to foreign nationals, and the Order of the British Empire.

Eat that, social media.

For me, her tireless research and dogmatic stance on tradition affirmed itself as a young Mexican cook and, later, as a food writer and researcher.

The first time I met Diana, I was in awe. Not just because of her rock star status as a cookbook author, but because of the way she, well into her 70s, kept everyone in check. Stubborn is too soft a word for Diana. A relentless critic and perfectionist, she would never hesitate to express her disdain, even her disgust, for things that did not correspond to her views, from food to politics.

My first experience with this trait came in 1999 when, as a fledgling food writer and recent anthropology graduate, an essay I submitted to a writing competition sponsored by the University of Oxford earned an honorable mention and was published in the prestigious Culinary Notes, a serious publication on the history of food. My subject was the history of tamales.

Some copies of the publication came with a letter of congratulations, signed by none other than the great food historian, Alan Davidson. “I thought you might like to read his commentary,” he said. Enclosed in the envelope was a scathing four-page review of my essay, by Diana Kennedy. It was a miracle that I didn’t pass out.

I was lucky enough to meet her in person at the legendary Fonda San Miguel in Austin in the early 2000s. In the late 70s, Diana helped owners Tom Gilliland and his partner Miguel Ravago, the late founding chef de Fonda, to craft the menu for the pioneering indoor Mexican restaurant. I introduced myself and she, searching the shores of her still vivid memory, remembered having criticized my essay. Hours of conversation followed.

A few years later, she agreed to participate in the lecture series that I organized and helped organize with the Latin American Studies Department at the University of Texas. She adamantly refused to let us film the presentation, stating that she “didn’t want people stealing her research”, even though her slides were over 40 years old. I had hoped to visit her at Quinta Diana, the eco-sustainable home she built near Zitacuaro, Michoacan, but our schedules never coincided – or maybe she wanted it to continue. She has always suspected or been jealous of other female food writers – even Mexican ones.

After the success of Julie and Julia, I thought of doing the same with The cuisines of Mexico, of which I have two editions. But since many ingredients are only found in Mexico, and at that, in specific regions and seasons, this proved difficult to do in Texas. And I didn’t want to upset her, rather than honor her, with my attempt.

During our last visit together, I asked him to let me write his biography. “No one cares,” she said very seriously. She wouldn’t move.

In 2019, she returned to Texas to donate her collection of cookbooks, personal notes and correspondence to the University of Texas at San Antonio. During a meeting at Fonda in Austin, for the first time since I had known her, she looked frail and tired. Surrounded by adoring fans who wanted their books autographed, I chose not to burden him further.

“Many of the recipes at Fonda San Miguel were inspired by our dear friend Diana Kennedy, who liked to describe herself as the ‘Mick Jagger of Mexican cuisine,'” Gilliland wrote on Fonda’s Facebook page alongside a candid photo of Kennedy hung at the restaurant. . “It captures the authority of Mexican cuisine as Fonda San Miguel will remember it: living life on her terms, to the fullest, as does her passion for Mexican cuisine and its people. Long live Diana Kennedy!

In effect.

]]>
New family-run Mexican restaurant Underdogs Cantina is now open near Oracle Park https://mexicalibluescafe.com/new-family-run-mexican-restaurant-underdogs-cantina-is-now-open-near-oracle-park/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/new-family-run-mexican-restaurant-underdogs-cantina-is-now-open-near-oracle-park/ Those in the Sunset District know well how hard it is to eat a Nick’s Way taco, which sports a fried corn tortilla inside a soft corn tortilla, at Underdogs, two pitchers of beer in a game, be it the San Jose Sharks or Golden State Warriors. Now owner Doug Marschke has good news: good […]]]>

Those in the Sunset District know well how hard it is to eat a Nick’s Way taco, which sports a fried corn tortilla inside a soft corn tortilla, at Underdogs, two pitchers of beer in a game, be it the San Jose Sharks or Golden State Warriors. Now owner Doug Marschke has good news: good vibes and great food aren’t just for West San Francisco residents anymore. Underdogs has opened a new outpost in South Beach, Underdogs Cantina, and Marschke wants the new location to be entirely community-focused. ” I sought [for a new neighborhood] for a long time,” says Marschke. “This is a neighborhood that has been hit hard by COVID.”

For the uninitiated, Marschke took ownership of the first Underdogs in 2008 and with it came a taco-centric menu designed by Nick Fasanella; think a sports bar with a robust California Mexican menu with burritos around $12. The lease at 128 King Street, directly across from Oracle Park, was available late last year, and Marschke moved the Underdogs team in early April. This new location used to be a Peet’s Coffee, and while no lattes linger, Marschke says the vibe can invoke some of this cafe’s energy. The long bar, where espressos were once served, is still intact but the front area has been blown out and is now larger with an upstairs mezzanine with an arcade full of Skee-Ball and NASCAR pinball machines. “There aren’t a lot of family-friendly places,” Marschke says, referring specifically to places to hang out before Giants games. “There are a lot of places for the pre-game, but where do you go when you have your kids?”

Skee-Ball, pinball and live music are some of the attractions of the new Underdogs.
Underdogs

Even on non-baseball days, Marschke hopes people will find a reason to stroll through South Beach like they do in any other neighborhood. To cultivate this appeal, he plans to bring in musicians, DJs and artists of any kind. Regular themed music nights are on the vision board, as are block parties and pub crawls. Now that the permits are up, he hopes the neighbors will come by with ideas – he’s currently looking for a quiz host.

Food and drink are more important than ever. Queso fundido is one of the standouts here, a gooey shrine of cheese and fries (with optional extra wagyu beef), and new wing options and burrito bowls are on deck. A breakfast menu is also in preparation for the football season. But really, Marschke wants the area around Oracle Park to be as crazy as the madhouse around Wrigley Field, his hometown baseball stadium. He shows love for MoMo’s and Lucky Strike as examples of the reputation he would like the Underdogs to have in the area. “I’m from Chicago and I’m trying to create that same energy around Oracle,” Marschkle says. “There are a lot of great places around that I think people haven’t discovered yet.”

A photo of a carne asada taco.

The carne asada taco has been a draw at Underdogs since 2008.
Genesis Vallejo Photography

A picture of nachos.

Nachos aren’t new to the menu, though burrito bowls and queso fundido are additions to the list.
Genesis Vallejo Photography

Underdogs Canteen (128 King Street) is open from 10:30 a.m. to midnight every day of the week.

]]>
Mexican restaurant opens in former Shen Hua Berkeley space https://mexicalibluescafe.com/mexican-restaurant-opens-in-former-shen-hua-berkeley-space/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 22:52:04 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/mexican-restaurant-opens-in-former-shen-hua-berkeley-space/ In June, Berkeley residents mourned the loss of Shen Hua, a popular Chinese restaurant that had been open for nearly 25 years on College Avenue. Now the Elmwood neighborhood is getting a new restaurant: 5 Tacos & Beers, the second location of Mexican restaurant Albany, as first reported And now San Francisco. 5 Tacos chef […]]]>

In June, Berkeley residents mourned the loss of Shen Hua, a popular Chinese restaurant that had been open for nearly 25 years on College Avenue. Now the Elmwood neighborhood is getting a new restaurant: 5 Tacos & Beers, the second location of Mexican restaurant Albany, as first reported And now San Francisco.

5 Tacos chef and owner Lito Saldaña ran Berkeley’s Cancun Sabor Mexicana for 15 years until he decided to open his own restaurant, Los Moles in Emeryville (Los Moles now also has locations in El Cerrito and San Rafael). The idea for 5 Tacos & Beers, which opened in Albany in 2020, was born out of the popularity of “taco Tuesday” in Los Moles.

“We were very popular with Taco Tuesdays, so we decided to open a concept just for tacos and beers,” Saldaña told SFGATE.

Quesabirria at 5 Tacos & Beers at 1175 Solano Ave in Albany. A new restaurant location opens in Berkeley.

Courtesy of 5 tacos and beers

When 5 Tacos first opened they only served five types of tacos, hence the name. But Saldaña eventually added more options to the menu, including ceviche, flautas and vegan options. However, the specialty remains the tacos.

“It’s kind of like street tacos, but more like home-style — home-style which means we make everything from scratch, like we make handmade corn tortillas,” Saldaña said. “…I grew up in Mexico in a small town where we used to grow everything. We used to raise the animals and that was the meat we ate. So the idea is to “bringing quality ingredients. We really care about what the customer is going to eat here.”

5 Tacos also serves a long list of craft beers from local breweries, with no “corporate beers” on the menu, Saldaña said.

Papa's vegan flautas at 5 Tacos & Beers at 1175 Solano Ave in Albany.  A new restaurant location opens in Berkeley.

Papa’s vegan flautas at 5 Tacos & Beers at 1175 Solano Ave in Albany. A new restaurant location opens in Berkeley.

Courtesy of 5 tacos and beers

For him, moving into the space at 2914 College Ave. is a bit of a homecoming.

“I actually grew up mostly in Berkeley,” he said. “I can’t wait to be back in Berkeley. I think this place is great. I really like the area.”


The new Berkeley 5 Tacos & Beers is set to open in September. Another new Walnut Creek location is also set to open in the coming months at 1352 Locust Street.

5 Tacos & Beers, 2914 College Avenue, Berkeley. Opening in September.



]]>
Cornwall and McLean of Northern Colorado FC share their experiences as first signatories https://mexicalibluescafe.com/cornwall-and-mclean-of-northern-colorado-fc-share-their-experiences-as-first-signatories/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 02:32:31 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/cornwall-and-mclean-of-northern-colorado-fc-share-their-experiences-as-first-signatories/ WINDSOR — If anyone sees an Aussie man walking around in a cowboy hat, don’t worry, it’s just Northern Colorado FC’s Lachlan McLean embracing Weld County culture. Mayor John Gates said earlier this year that the annual Greeley Stampede is one of the city’s most unique events. Although it might seem obvious that he would […]]]>

WINDSOR — If anyone sees an Aussie man walking around in a cowboy hat, don’t worry, it’s just Northern Colorado FC’s Lachlan McLean embracing Weld County culture.

Mayor John Gates said earlier this year that the annual Greeley Stampede is one of the city’s most unique events. Although it might seem obvious that he would say that – it’s his job to create buzz in the community, after all – the Aussie agreed.

“Yeah, we don’t have that at all. Horses and rodeos and shit? laughs McLean. “I even bought myself a cowboy hat. What am I doing?”

McLean and defender Rob Cornwall were the first players to sign in the inaugural team, and they have already had a wonderful experience.

The striker spent seven years in the United States. He came to America to pursue a college career after things didn’t quite work out the way he wanted to return home.

“I was one of the only people in that upper echelon of players who missed a peek with an A-League team,” McLean said. The A-League is the equivalent of Major League Soccer in the United States. “I was looking for other ways to become a professional player.”

McLean’s “best pal” was already attending college in the United States, so he decided to do the same. College is an opportunity to get a taste of working life and improve athletically, while graduating and still being a kid, he said.

He’s been in the US for seven years and really enjoyed it. McLean took his trip to Colorado in 2019 and fell in love with the state, saying he had some of the best times of his life.

“Honestly, I never really looked back after that,” McLean said. “It was a big learning process, sure, but it was the best decision I’ve ever made.”

McLean said there are a lot of differences between America and Australia, aside from the Stampede.

Regarding Weld County, in particular, he noted the large Hispanic population and the food that goes with it. McLean loves Mexican food and was impressed with the places here.

Overall the food is different and the Australian higher education system is not the same. More than anything, however, McLean loves passion.

It doesn’t even have to be a professional sport. He talked about moviegoers, minor league baseball fans, and high school or college football in the South.

“You will always find someone who is passionate about something. Australia certainly has that, but it’s much less; people are more “going with the flow,” McLean said. “It’s almost as if the United States wants to be the best at everything. It can be good or bad, but I think I like it. This means they always invest time and money, and people support and support just about every facet of everything in life.

Midfielder Stefan Lukic of Serbia said in an interview for another article that he had no negative experience with anyone in Colorado. Everyone has been friendly.

Cornwall is a rookie in the United States. He was the first athlete to sign with Northern Colorado – McLean was the second – and hails from Dublin, Ireland.

“I like my potatoes and potatoes, and I adapt to a lot of rice,” Cornwall said of the one difference that came to mind. Maybe some locals can steer him towards top notch potatoes.

Other than that, he feels like things are similar, at least with the team.

“Personality-wise, I find everyone is the same,” Cornwall said. “If you’re a nice person, no matter where you come from, you’ll always be a nice person. I think that’s why everyone clicked.

His list was much shorter than McLean’s – whom he jokingly called a “fake Aussie” – and he didn’t attend the Stampede. In Cornwall’s defense he was busy.

Unlike McLean and some of his other teammates, Cornwall has been in the professional ranks for 10 years, playing with teams around the world. He signed his first pro contract as a teenager in Ireland and is working to complete his studies.

“I tried to go to college for a few weeks. It’s a course that my mother chose,” Cornwall said. “It was, like, IT; I hated. I did not understand. »

He decided that wasn’t what he wanted to do and left college. Instead, he gambled and did odd jobs. In the past two years, however, he has decided to pursue studies in strength and conditioning. It should be nearing the end, assuming there are no major setbacks.

“I’ll do it, then I’ll do my coaching badges,” he said. “I started the study late.”

be the first

More important than just living in the United States are player roles in the Hailstorm.

Prior to signing with the Hailstorm, McLean frequented Southern Illinois-Edwardsville and was a member of the Greenville Triumph. He bonded with Northern Colorado head coach Éamon Zayed, who was with the Chattanooga Red Wolves at the time.

Cornwall was with Bohemian FC in Ireland when former teammate Zayed called about the club.

Zayed told them about plans not just for the Future Legends Complex franchise. Cornwall said he saw the plans for the project and “signed off immediately”.

Both players wanted to be part of the build from the ground up – literally, because Future Legends is still under construction.

“Being part of the beginning of everything is pretty cool. What you do as an individual and as a team in this first year will be in the history books, so it’s really special for me, really special for just about everyone on the team,” McLean said. “We know that when we put our seals on at the end of this year, it will be the first year in Hailstorm’s history, and I think it’s pretty surreal to be part of this group.”

The Hailstorm beat Real Salt Lake early in the season, giving the franchise its first victory against an MLS team. It has also been competitive against other USL League One teams.

He is still working on the pitch and with the home complex, Cornwall said, but things are still going well. The goals of making the playoffs and hopefully winning a title remain a priority, and the team is made up of good guys who all want it.

“I think the main part of football, for our football team, is the culture. I think this team has a great culture. Everyone is really nice. It’s a good community and we get along really well” Cornwall said. “It’s a big part of playing well. Obviously the results weren’t right at the start, but, look, we’re a new team. It’s going to take some time to gel.” , and it’s also all different cultures playing with each other. There’s Irish, English, Australian, Asian, American. It’ll take a while, but it’s starting to click.

Hailstorm’s next game is scheduled for 6 p.m. Saturday at Forward Madison. He will face the Richmond Kickers at 7 p.m. on August 2, but the location has not been determined.

]]>
Famous Mexican restaurant Casper teams up with famous star Jeffree to serve yak meat https://mexicalibluescafe.com/famous-mexican-restaurant-casper-teams-up-with-famous-star-jeffree-to-serve-yak-meat/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 23:59:38 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/famous-mexican-restaurant-casper-teams-up-with-famous-star-jeffree-to-serve-yak-meat/ ***For all things Wyoming, sign up for our daily newsletter*** By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily Casper restaurant owner Alex Rosales did not know the richly dressed blond man. Rosales thought his client was just someone who liked to look lavish while eating Mexican food. But it turns out that Tacos Mexico regular was Jeffree […]]]>

***For all things Wyoming, sign up for our daily newsletter***

By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Casper restaurant owner Alex Rosales did not know the richly dressed blond man. Rosales thought his client was just someone who liked to look lavish while eating Mexican food.

But it turns out that Tacos Mexico regular was Jeffree Star, YouTuber and cosmetics mogul and resident of Casper, who likes to look his best at all times.

“My girls had to tell me who he was,” Rosales told the Cowboy State Daily on Wednesday. “Even then, we didn’t treat it differently. We treated him like a normal customer, because that’s what he is.

It was about two years ago.

Fast forward to this week, when Rosales will include meat in some of his restaurant’s dishes from Star-raised yaks.

On Friday, Tacos Mexico will unveil Star Yak Ranch carne desebrada, a type of shredded meat. Restaurant patrons can try yak desebrada as a chimichanga or a shredded meat platter with queso freso, rice and more. The restaurant will be offering more cuts of yak meat in the coming weeks as a weekend special.

Rosales was skeptical when he first tried yak meat, but said Star’s product made him a believer.



“We weren’t really thinking about changing the menu, because we’re pretty much set on our dishes,” Rosales said. “But we had yak meat for our personal use and it was really good. It has a good flavor, but it’s not as fatty as beef.

Weeks after Rosales tried yak meat, Star stopped by the restaurant to inquire about a partnership between his yak ranch and Tacos Mexico, which has been in business in Casper for 22 years.

Rosales said he and his team are ready to try something new, creating new dishes with exotic meat.

He also said it seemed like Star’s willingness to seek out the restaurant and ask him for a partnership, rather than the other way around, indicates a quality in the food served by Tacos Mexico.

“It’s very flattering because he told us he’s been to a lot of places and he really liked what we were doing,” Rosales said. “Here we are in Casper, Wyoming and for someone to recognize what you’re doing and he’s totally into it.”

Star started selling yak meat earlier this year. He has set up pop-up shops in the Casper area where people can buy various cuts of meat and beef jerky.

Rosales said the length of the partnership depends on Star’s supply of yak meat to the restaurant, but he expects the partnership with Star to attract customers from across Wyoming and the rest of the country.

The restaurant has already been featured on Star’s YouTube channel and other social media platforms, earning it increased recognition.

“He’s one of those guys who is a perfectionist, from presenting to publicity,” Rosales said. “We all want to step up and provide our customers with something a little better than average.”

Star did not return Cowboy State Daily’s request for comment on Wednesday.

***For all things Wyoming, sign up for our daily newsletter***

]]>
Fonda Lupita in Sanford NC moves to new space, location https://mexicalibluescafe.com/fonda-lupita-in-sanford-nc-moves-to-new-space-location/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 09:45:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/fonda-lupita-in-sanford-nc-moves-to-new-space-location/ Fonda Lupita, the famous gordita boutique that jumped onto the national restaurant map, has moved on, but you’ll still find it in Sanford. After landing on List of Best New Eater’s Restaurants over the past year, Fonda Lupita has grown from its tiny spot in Jonesboro Heights to a sprawling 6,000 square foot space that […]]]>

Fonda Lupita, the famous gordita boutique that jumped onto the national restaurant map, has moved on, but you’ll still find it in Sanford.

After landing on List of Best New Eater’s Restaurants over the past year, Fonda Lupita has grown from its tiny spot in Jonesboro Heights to a sprawling 6,000 square foot space that can accommodate 150 people.

The new Fonda Lupita, located at 1948 S. Horner Blvd., Suite B, opened on June 27. On Friday, July 1, the line was open for three straight hours.

“The place is huge and there was nowhere for customers to sit,” owner Biridiana Frausto told The News & Observer. “I never imagined it would happen so quickly.”

Fonda Lupita moves into a space that was most recently a Japanese restaurant, but is still best known as the old Pizza Inn. Frausto said it took three coats of primer to reset the walls, which are now covered in bright, vibrant murals.

“If you’ve ever been to Mexico or are Mexican, the print brings a lot of traditional Mexican artwork,” Frausto said. “It’s so different from what it was, there’s so much more light. I feel like it’s alive now.

In terms of food, the Fonda Lupita menu is much the same, based on gorditas and stews, served in the form of small pockets of grilled masa stuffed with pressed pork, or pastor or birria.

“We didn’t want to lose the essence of food and what we’re trying to do here,” Frausto said.

There are also burritos and quessabirria tacos and quesadillas. Tortilla chips are also new, with Frausto noting that they are the most traditional and thickest version of fried tortilla found in Mexico.

“These are the original Mexican fries,” Frausto said. “That’s what people eat in Mexico.”

The biggest change from the original location is that Fonda Lupita now has a bar, serving margaritas with freshly squeezed juices, as well as six agua frescas and bottled beer. Draft beer will be added later, Frausto said, with a tap reserved for the Sanford Hugger Mugger brewery.

FONDALUPITA18-FE-011922-JEL.JPG
Fonda Lupita serves a variety of gorditas, including this chicharron prensado. The restaurant opened last year on Main Street in Sanford. Juli Leonard jleonard@newsobserver.com

National attention

Last year, Fonda Lupita was the only restaurant in North Carolina included in online food publication Eater’s annual list of the best new restaurants in the country.

Sanford’s little spot was born as a stew, and its gorditas have become a culinary phenomenon, with diners traveling from the Triangle and Charlotte and beyond for a meal.

So far, crowds have found the new spot. A crate of elote corn used to last a week, but now it’s gone in less than two days.

“I was a bit desperate to move,” Frausto said. “The space was getting too small, with too many cooks in the kitchen. We are very excited about the new space.

As for the former space, it will be transformed into a Mexican torta shop, Frausto said, serving the pressed sandwiches filled with many Fonda Lupita stews, as well as versions like chicken parmesan and milanesa.

The Fonda torta boutique will open later this year.

FONDALUPITA29-FE-011922-JEL.JPG
Owner Biridiana Frausto, center, steps in to do everything at her restaurant, Fonda Lupita, including working the line on Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. The Sanford restaurant serves homemade Mexican cuisine based on Frausto’s mother’s recipes and is changing its daily menu. Juli Leonard jleonard@newsobserver.com

Victoria

Frausto and her husband, Salvador Alvarez, are also planning a second Triangle restaurant, following the opening earlier this year of La Buena Vida in North Raleigh.

Frausto said La Victoria will open at Cary’s Arborteum in Weston, near Harrison Avenue, unlike its other two restaurants.

“It’s going to be a whole other thing,” Frausto said. “Totally different from Fonda and Buena Vida, but with a twist of both places for sure.”

Drew Jackson writes about restaurants and dining for The News & Observer and The Herald-Sun, covering the Triangle and North Carolina food scene.

]]>
Mexican restaurant Rosita’s, a staple of downtown DeKalb, turns 50 this weekend – Shaw Local https://mexicalibluescafe.com/mexican-restaurant-rositas-a-staple-of-downtown-dekalb-turns-50-this-weekend-shaw-local/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 01:26:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/mexican-restaurant-rositas-a-staple-of-downtown-dekalb-turns-50-this-weekend-shaw-local/ DeKALB – Rosita’s Mexican restauranta family staple in downtown DeKalb, will celebrate its 50th anniversary this weekend with two festive events for guests to enjoy. Special events commemorating this milestone are scheduled for Saturday and Sunday and will include salsa dancing lessons on the patio and live music by local band, Home by 12, and […]]]>

DeKALB – Rosita’s Mexican restauranta family staple in downtown DeKalb, will celebrate its 50th anniversary this weekend with two festive events for guests to enjoy.

Special events commemorating this milestone are scheduled for Saturday and Sunday and will include salsa dancing lessons on the patio and live music by local band, Home by 12, and a Mariachi Band. A ceremonial toast and the cutting of the birthday cake should kick off all the festivities planned for the weekend.

Rosa Balli, owner of Mexican restaurant Rosita, said knowing that the family business turns 50 this year means a lot to her.

“There’s a lot of emotion,” Balli said. “It has always been part of our lives. We grew up with it. It’s a bit like a brother. He is always there.

Rosa’s parents, Luis and Beatriz Balli, opened Rosita’s in 1972. The establishment grew over the years from one building to three in 1992. The expansions allowed the restaurant to serve more customers at any given time.

“My mom was a really good cook,” Balli said. “It grew from there little by little.”

Balli said her parents, who are both deceased, would be happy to know the business has been around for so long.

“People coming in and their kids coming in,” Balli said. “Now their children’s children are coming. … By getting to know your customers when you see them once a week or once every two weeks, you begin to bond with that person. It’s not just about the restaurant, it’s about getting to know them and their lives.

Balli said the restaurant gave her a lot of fond memories to reflect on.

But things haven’t always looked rosy for Rosita and her prospects.

“To be honest with you, it was very scary not knowing if you were going to be about six months old or not, because we had no experience of a pandemic and life seemed to have stood still when it appeared for the first time in 2020,” Balli said. . “When you have a business, you have people working for you, and you also make a living out of it, and there’s no one coming to the door anymore, it’s very scary emotionally. But luckily, we survived it.

Balli said she was able to look positively at the restaurant’s future, despite worries about inflation.

“We’re better than we were last year, we’re better than we were the year before,” she said. “It’s partly because our community is extremely loyal to us. For me, there is something to be said for that.

Balli said Rosita prides itself on providing its customers with a unique experience.

“Our food is good,” Balli said. “Everything we make, we make in-house. There is nothing prefabricated. »

Balli added that Rosita is huge at building and maintaining relationships with her clients.

“There’s someone there that you’ll know from our family or our management when you walk through the door,” Balli said.

Rosita’s typically offers lunch and dinner options, as well as group and catering options. Guests can eat inside or outside on the patio.

Balli said she hoped people would come celebrate with Rosita.

A portion of the restaurant’s sales on its anniversary weekend will be used to support the DeKalb County Community Foundation.

If you are going to:

Ceremonial toast and cutting of the birthday cake

When: 3 p.m. Saturday, July 16

Live music on the terrace by Home by 12

When: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, July 16

Salsa lessons on the terrace

When: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday 17

Live Mariachi Band

When: 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday, July 17

]]>
Best restaurants in Eugene-Springfield for Oregon22, according to readers https://mexicalibluescafe.com/best-restaurants-in-eugene-springfield-for-oregon22-according-to-readers/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 16:40:57 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/best-restaurants-in-eugene-springfield-for-oregon22-according-to-readers/ There’s a lot to enjoy when it comes to Eugene-Springfield’s restaurant scene. There is a little something for everyone. The Register-Guard asked readers to share their insider knowledge on the best places to eat that are unique to the region. The majority of restaurants on this list of recommendations are locally owned. Here’s a diverse […]]]>

There’s a lot to enjoy when it comes to Eugene-Springfield’s restaurant scene. There is a little something for everyone. The Register-Guard asked readers to share their insider knowledge on the best places to eat that are unique to the region. The majority of restaurants on this list of recommendations are locally owned. Here’s a diverse list of choices from global flavors to food cart discoveries to family meals.

beer garden is inspired by the traditional beergarden as a gathering place for the community to share a pint and a meal, and features 42 taps of beer, wine, cider, kombucha and soda and six food trucks, including Moi Poki , Lani Moku Grill, Coffeegarden, Once Famous, Coco Loco, Pizza Alta, Nosh Shop, 777 W. Sixth Ave., Eugene.

Black Diamond Coffeedrive-thru serving smoothies, sandwiches, pancakes, protein snacks, 603 W. Centennial Blvd., Springfield.

Good Mi, Vietnamese French Kitchen, 153 E. Broadway, Eugene.

Soriah Cafeoffering Mediterranean products using fresh Pacific Northwest foods for over 20 years, 384 W. 13th Ave., Eugene.

Coffee Yum!, a restaurant chain that started in Eugene in 1997 serving unique rice and bean bowls with its famous Yumm! Sauce:

  • Coffee Yum! 5th Street, 550 Pearl Street, Suite 130, Eugene
  • Yumm! Cafe – East 13th, 860 E. 13th Ave., Eugene
  • Yumm! Cafe – North Delta Center, 1005 Green Acres Road, Eugene
  • Yumm! Cafe – Oakway Center, 130 Oakway Center, Eugene
  • Café Yumm!-Le Meridien, 1801 Willamette St., Eugene
  • Yumm!-on Gateway Cafe, 3340 Gateway St., Springfield

Bonz with Chickenestablished in Springfield in 2002, it offers chicken wings with free sauces, burgers and a salad bar, 1815 Pioneer Parkway East, Springfield.

Chi’s Korean Tacos, Asian Fusion, 30 W. 10th Ave, Eugene.

Coburg Pizza Company, gourmet pizza flavors of Italy with an international twist, with the original location in Coburg, 90999 S Willamette St, Coburg, and one in Springfield, 1710 Centennial Blvd, Springfield.

Brewing over a cold fire, a small craft brewery in Eugene at 263 Mill St., offers food trucks such as Yardy, Stretched Noodles, Pizzeria DOP, Paper Plate BBQ, Yabai Nikkei, as well as several taps of their beers. Check the website for the food truck schedule and what’s playing.

cornbread coffee, a vegan comfort food that values ​​human and animal rights and “hopes to keep animals off our plates as we fight, daily, for social and racial justice and the environment,” 1290 W. Seventh Ave. , Eugene.

Cornucopia Restaurant, Modern pub fare and award-winning, locally sourced craft drinks that have been around for 25 years.

  • Cornucopia Restaurant at 17, 295 W 17th Ave, Eugene
  • Cornucopia Restaurant on 5th, 207 E 5th Ave, Eugene
  • Cornucopia Restaurant Main Street, 521 Main Street, Springfield

DaNang Vietnamese Restaurant, food truck located in the Oregon Wine Lab Urban Winery and Tasting Lounge, 488 Lincoln St., Eugene.

The Davis Restaurant & Bar in Downtown Eugene offers quick bites and small and large plates at 94 W. Broadway, Eugene.

Eighth and Olive Food Truck Podlocated in a central downtown location behind Mr. Jacob’s Furniture on West Seventh Avenue, features popular trucks including All Thai’d Up, Bali Kitchen Eugene, Bing King, Makeda’s Ethiopian Cuisine, Cafe Agora and El Buen Sabor, 725 Olive St., Eugene.

El Charro Mexican Restaurant, local family restaurant with two locations:

  • El Charro Eugene Mexican Restaurant, 4712 Royal Ave., Eugene
  • El Charro Springfield Mexican Restaurant, 495 Harlow Road, Springfield

The Super Burrito, 2566 Willamette Street, Eugene.

The Friendly Garden Food Truck Pod in Eugene’s friendly neighborhood, 2758 Friendly St., has a covered area with food trucks including a fruit and vine drink cart, Masa’s Yatai Japanese restaurant, Taqueria Autentica Comida Oaxaquena de Silva, the Bartolotti pizza, Uumami Mediterranean.

Graffiti Alley Food Truck Pod, 675 River Road in Eugene, includes Ciderlicious Cider Garden & Tap Cart, Easley Does It, Braised Restaurant.

Gordon’s Tavernlocated inside the Gordon Hotel, 555 Oak St., Eugene, serves classic American comfort food with a Northwest twist.

Hawaiian time offers a plated lunch, a traditional Hawaiian meal of protein, macaroni salad and rice, and hot sandwiches at several locations in the area:

  • Coburg Road, 333 Coburg Road, Eugene
  • West 11th Hawaiian Time, 3510 W. 11th Ave.
  • Springfield Hawaiian Time, 1865 Olympic St., Springfield
  • Hawaiian Time River Road, 2080 River Road, Eugene

Hey neighbor pizzeria Located about two blocks from Hayward Field on the same block as Prince Puckler Ice Cream, at 1621 E 19th Ave., it serves hand-baked “Neo-Neapolitan pies.”

Irie Jamaican cuisine, a traveling family kitchen serving traditional Jamaican cuisine makes appearances at the Saturday market and area festivals. During the World Championships, find them at the food trucks on Agate Street and East 18th Alley near Hayward Field.

Izakaya Meiji Co., a Japanese tavern offering seasonal Japanese comfort food and small plates plus a full bar with over 100 whiskeys, sake, wine and shochu in Eugene’s Whiteaker neighborhood at 345 Van Buren St.

Kesey Square Food Truck Pod, located right in the middle of downtown at Willamette Street and East Broadway, Eugene.

Krob Krua Thai FoodThai cuisine served at WildCraft Cider Works, 254 Lincoln St.

Kung Fu Bistro is an authentic Chines Sichuan restaurant at 2560 Willamette St, Eugene.

Market offers local and seasonal French cuisine, in the 5e Public street market at 296 E. Fifth Ave. in Eugene.

At Mazzi’s serving Italian and Sicilian cuisine since 1970, 3377 E. Amazon Drive, Eugene.

Pizzeria Mezza Luna, open since 2005, serves homemade pizzas sold by the slice and by the pie.

  • Mezza Luna Pizzeria – Pearl, 933 Pearl St., Eugene
  • Mezza Luna Pizzeria – Shadowview, 2776 Shadowview, Eugene
  • Mezza Luna Pizzeria – Springfield, 115 S. 5th St., Springfield

morning glory coffee, Eugene’s oldest vegetarian and vegan restaurant, serving organic, local, and from-scratch breakfasts and lunches, 450 Willamette St., Eugene.

Northwest Burgers, freshly ground burgers created by the Kirsch family, a husband-wife team who founded and are chefs. There are two locations: at 5th Street Public Market, 296 E. Fifth Ave., #220, in Eugene, and at the Public House, 418 A St., in Springfield.

Oakshire Public House Oakshire has a small brewery northwest of Eugene. His public house, 207 Madison St, Eugene, offers a rotating schedule of food carts — including Pinch of Salt, Bounty Meat and Cheese, Ojisan Ramen, Arekie Indian Fusion, Rackhouse BBQ — and 20 taps.

pandite, a fusion Mexican taqueria with a twist and a bar, 398 E. 11th Ave., Eugene.

Daddy’s Pizzeria is a local, family-run pizzeria that can serve crowds with multiple locations:

  • Papa’s Pizza Parlor-Coburg, 1577 Coburg Road, Eugene
  • Papa’s Pizza Parlor-West 11th, 1700 W. 11th Ave., Eugene
  • Papa’s Pizza Parlor-Springfield, 4011 Main Street, Springfield

Prince Puckers Ice Creamjust blocks from Hayward Field, has been serving its foodies since 1975. Prepare to line up at this local favorite that served President Obama, 1605 E. 19th Ave., Eugene.

PublicHouse, a former church at 418 A St #4606 in Springfield is a food pod hub, brewery, beer garden and whiskey bar. Food offerings from Fisherman’s Market, Moi Poki Grill, NW Burgers Annex, Pizza Cue, Squacho’s.

Steve’s breakfast and more is tucked away at 117 14th St. in Springfield.

Southtown Station, located near Willamette Street and 29e Avenue, this relatively new food truck mod, features seven trucks including Lalito’s Taqueria, Retro Meltz, Flame-N-Ray’s Southern Vegan Kitchen, Lily Belle Bistro, Vegimoto by Viva! Vegetarian Grill, Elegant Elephant Baking Co., 2871 Oak St., Eugene.

Sy’s New York Pizza has been at the same spot one block west of the UO campus at 1211 Alder St. in Eugene for over 40 years, serving up authentic New York style pie.

Tacovore, a Mexican taqueria in the Whiteaker neighborhood of Eugene, offers tacos (local with gluten-free, vegetarian, and vegan options), tequila, beer, and signature cocktails. 530 Blair Blvd, Eugene.

Thai spice, Thai-inspired cuisine inside 5th Street Public Market, 296 E. Fifth Ave., Eugene.

Third & Van Buren Food Truck Pod, 267 Van Buren St., Eugene includes Subo Sushi Burritos, Kai Asian Street Food.

Pub Viking Braggot-Southtowneat 2490 Willamette St. In Eugene, brews a full line of braggots (one of the oldest fermented drinks, pioneered by the Vikings that takes elements of beer and fermented honey (or mead) that comes with dishes Scandinavian comforters.

Wheel API Pizza Pub This is a New Haven, Connecticut-style “apizza” (Ah-Beetz) lounge that meets San Francisco-inspired naturally leavened dough with craft beer and carefully selected ingredients, 390 Lincoln St. , #101, Eugene.

]]>
Creek View Grill offers another choice for dining in Hayden https://mexicalibluescafe.com/creek-view-grill-offers-another-choice-for-dining-in-hayden/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 01:26:20 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/creek-view-grill-offers-another-choice-for-dining-in-hayden/ Maritza JaundeDios waits for customers during the start of the lunch rush on Tuesday, July 12, 2022 at Creek View Grill. It opened at 825 W. Jefferson St. in Hayden on Saturday, July 9, 2022.John F. Russell / Steamboat Pilot and Today Owner Maritza JaundeDios was all smiles as she danced between the tables on […]]]>
Maritza JaundeDios waits for customers during the start of the lunch rush on Tuesday, July 12, 2022 at Creek View Grill. It opened at 825 W. Jefferson St. in Hayden on Saturday, July 9, 2022.
John F. Russell / Steamboat Pilot and Today

Owner Maritza JaundeDios was all smiles as she danced between the tables on Tuesday afternoon, July 12, waiting for customers and breathing new life into Creek View Grill on the west side of Hayden.

“We do breakfast, lunch and dinner,” JaundeDios said. “It’s a great community, and I think I can make it work.”

She opened the doors to the new Creek View Grill on Saturday, July 9, opening a new chapter for the Peruvian immigrant who has worked in the restaurant business for 20 years and has been employed by Rex’s Family of Restaurants for over 10 years. She said the Creek View Grill is a family business, in which she partnered with her brother Ray JaundeDios



The venue that seats 78 indoors plus deck has in the past housed a string of restaurants – including the original Creek View Grill (no connection), which closed over 10 years ago. More recently, it housed the Sunnyside Bar and Grill, which closed in late 2021.

JaundeDios said the menu at the new Creek View Grill will offer a mix of American and Mexican dishes, and customers might be treated to a few Peruvian specialties from time to time.



She said she wanted to offer a varied menu so that the Creek View Grill would appeal to a number of different tastes and that her regulars could find something they like on the menu no matter how often they cross the doors.

“I want people to try everything,” JaundeDio said. “It’s a big menu, but nobody wants to eat a cheeseburger every day, so they can choose different things on different days.”

The Creek View Grill opened on Saturday, July 9, 2022. It is new owner Maritza JaundeDios’ first restaurant, but she has worked in restaurants for 20 years, including more than a decade with the Rex family of restaurants. .
John F. Russell / Steamboat Pilot and Today

Guests who walk through the doors will find omelets, waffles, and pancakes in the morning, as well as breakfast and muffled burritos. They’ll also find steak and eggs, huevos rancheros, and eggs Benedict.

The Creek View Grill will also offer a selection of burgers including the Hayden burger and six hot sandwiches including a patty melt, Reuben, BLT and French dip. The restaurant also offers tender baskets of shrimp and chicken. There is a large selection of entrees ranging from chicken fried steak to ribeye to half a rack of ribs. For appetites that venture south of the border, there’s a Mexican burrito, enchilada, and Carne Asada.

“I think the key is that it’s open for breakfast, lunch and dinner,” said Hayden Town Manager Mathew Mendisco. “Whatever I want, I can get it. If I want a breakfast burrito, I can have one. If I need a burger, I can have one, and if I want a steak, I can have one.

The Creek View Grill opened on Saturday, July 9, 2022 and features a large dining room that seats nearly 80 people and a full bar. JaundeDios said Creek View is still awaiting a county liquor license, but once that’s in place, customers will be able to purchase adult beverages at the location that serves breakfast, lunch and dinner.
John F. Russell / Steamboat Pilot and Today

JaundeDio said Creek View is in the process of being approved by the county for a liquor license, and once that’s in place, people will be able to purchase alcoholic beverages at the restaurant.

Mendisco said Hayden has a number of food trucks in town that offer great food, but the addition of the Creek View Grill will only expand Hayden’s range of dining choices. He said JaundeDios’ story is a perfect example of the “American Dream”.

Creek View Grill is open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week.

“You come here and work hard, earn some money and open a restaurant,” Mendisco said. “She’s worked in restaurants all her life and I hope she does well.”

Seating 78, Creek View Grill will provide another dining option for residents of Hayden and surrounding communities.
John F. Russell / Steamboat Pilot and Today

]]>