Mexican Recipe – Mexicali Blues Cafe http://mexicalibluescafe.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 03:01:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Mexican Recipe – Mexicali Blues Cafe http://mexicalibluescafe.com/ 32 32 Headline inflation in Mexico fell in early November, with core inflation rising https://mexicalibluescafe.com/headline-inflation-in-mexico-fell-in-early-november-with-core-inflation-rising/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:03:52 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/headline-inflation-in-mexico-fell-in-early-november-with-core-inflation-rising/ MEXICO CITY, Nov 22 (Reuters) – Mexico’s annual headline inflation is expected to have eased in the first half of November but remain well above official targets, a Reuters poll showed on Tuesday, leaving the door open for further interest rate hikes by the country’s central bank. The median forecast from 16 analysts calls for […]]]>

MEXICO CITY, Nov 22 (Reuters) – Mexico’s annual headline inflation is expected to have eased in the first half of November but remain well above official targets, a Reuters poll showed on Tuesday, leaving the door open for further interest rate hikes by the country’s central bank.

The median forecast from 16 analysts calls for a slowdown in annual headline inflation to 8.24% from 8.28% recorded in the second half of October.

As annual inflation continues to decelerate after peaking at 8.77% in the second half of August, core inflation is now expected to pick up to 8.60%, a level not seen since August 2000.

The underlying index, seen as a better gauge of inflation as it excludes volatility in food and energy prices, is expected to climb 0.30% in the first 15 days of the month against in the previous semester.

Meanwhile, consumer prices are expected to have risen 0.65% over the period.

The forecast keeps annual inflation well above the Bank of Mexico’s target of 3% plus or minus one percentage point.

Banxico, as the central bank is known, has raised Mexico’s benchmark interest rate by 600 basis points since June 2021, bringing the rate to its current level of 10%.

The bank is due to hold its next monetary policy meeting on Dec. 15, when analysts expect rates to rise 50 basis points after four consecutive 75 basis point hikes.

The Mexican Institute of Statistics will publish inflation data for the first half of November on Thursday at 6 am (1200 GMT).

Reporting by Noe Torres; Additional reporting by Gabriel Burin; Editing by Cynthia Osterman

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Best in travel? A deserved honor for New Mexico | Editorials https://mexicalibluescafe.com/best-in-travel-a-deserved-honor-for-new-mexico-editorials/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/best-in-travel-a-deserved-honor-for-new-mexico-editorials/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Taste the Great Mexican Food Journey in Foxton https://mexicalibluescafe.com/taste-the-great-mexican-food-journey-in-foxton/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 04:24:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/taste-the-great-mexican-food-journey-in-foxton/ Tuesday, November 15, 2022, 5:24 p.m.Press Release: Horowhenua District Council After attracting curious crowds in Wellington and Christchurch, the very famous colors and flavors of Mexico are now coming to Foxton. The “De la Milpa a la Mesa: A Mexican Food Journey” exhibit will bring a taste of Latin America to Horowhenua during the holiday […]]]>

After attracting curious crowds in Wellington and Christchurch, the very famous colors and flavors of Mexico are now coming to Foxton.

The “De la Milpa a la Mesa: A Mexican Food Journey” exhibit will bring a taste of Latin America to Horowhenua during the holiday season.

State-of-the-art facilities and interactive gadgets, all about the country’s agricultural and culinary heritage, will be on display at Te Awahou Nieuwe Stroom from November 25 to the end of January.

“We wanted to do something different and exciting this holiday season, especially for families,” says Arjan van der Boon, Marketing Manager of Te Awahou Riverside Culture Park.

“With kids looking for something to do, parents can take them to our art gallery. They can play and learn all sorts of interesting things about a country with delicious cuisine. Most people are already familiar with tacos or guacamole. Now you can discover how to prepare Mexican dishes and learn about the fascinating and diverse culinary history that Mexico has to offer.

“De la Milpa a la Mesa” celebrates the richness of Mexican cuisine, from farms and markets to restaurants and home kitchens. Farmers, scientists, vendors and cooks from across Mexico share their unique perspectives on agriculture, climate change, food sovereignty and how their diverse communities deal with global concerns in their daily lives – concerns similar to those encountered in Aotearoa, New Zealand.

“What’s great about Foxton is always how the community comes together behind these kinds of initiatives,” says Arjan. “And this time, the cafes in our cultural park will serve Mexican dishes, while De Molen will grind corn flour in the windmill. Whānau can experiment with making their own tasty tortillas at home.

A program of events and a set of learning resources accompany “De la Milpa a la Mesa”, which will be shared with schools in Horowhenua, Manawatū, Whanganui and Kāpiti.

The exhibition, very well documented, was created within the framework of an international collaboration. It was developed through a partnership between the Museum and Heritage Studies (VUW) program at Te Herenga Waka Victoria University in Wellington and the Posgrado en Estudios y Prácticas Museales program at the Escuela Nacional de Conservación, Restauración y Museografía from the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (ENCRyM) in Mexico City. Seven postgraduate students in New Zealand and two in Mexico City carried out the development work, as part of a supervised internship under the Latin America Center of Excellence’s Cultural Sector Partnership Program for Asia -Pacific (LatAm CAPE).

The exhibit is the result of years of collaborative efforts between Dr. Lee Davidson of VUW and Dr. Leticia Pérez Castellanos of ENCRyM.

Commenting on the exhibit’s relevance to New Zealand, Dr Davidson said: “Many New Zealanders know little about Mexico beyond the stereotypes found in films and the media. In creating this exhibition, we wanted to share the richness and diversity of Mexican culture through something that New Zealanders can easily identify with: food and agriculture. Visitors will be surprised and inspired by the fascinating stories and people they meet in the exhibit.

Dr Pérez agrees: “As a Mexican who has been to New Zealand, I am amazed at the similarities and differences between our two countries, and I always hope that more New Zealanders will learn more about Mexico and vice versa. I am proud to participate in “De la Milpa a la Mesa” and to be able to communicate unique aspects of my culture, so that people can engage with it and be curious to learn and experience more. »

The first section of the exhibition, the ‘milpa’, highlights the importance of biodiversity and the critical role that small-scale farmers and scientists play in adapting to old and new threats to their ecosystems.

The “mercado” (or market) then offers an immersive experience with the sights, sounds and smells of Mexico’s many famous and varied neighborhood markets.

The “mesa” showcases the spectrum of culinary options, from home cooks preserving generations of recipes to upscale restaurant owners bringing cutting-edge Mexican cuisine to the world’s attention.

For a lasting taste of the exhibition, visitors can take home recipes from New Zealand’s Mexican communities to their own kitchens.

“The exhibition was informed by the latest thinking on cross-cultural museum practices and visitor engagement,” commented Dr. Matthew O’Meagher, director of CAPE Latin America, which supported the project.

“To do business with Latin America, New Zealanders must first know this region. We are therefore delighted to help New Zealanders discover the richness of Mexican culture and see the social and environmental similarities between us. The exhibition promotes intercultural dialogue on issues such as climate change, sustainability and the future of agriculture and consumption.

CAPE Latin America was established in July 2017 to bring New Zealand closer to Latin America. By combining academic experience with agile delivery systems, CAPE helps New Zealanders deepen sustainable, forward-looking growth and business relationships, and build knowledgeable schools and universities. It does this by providing evidence-based programs, events and tools that are made available to the general New Zealand public.

The Latin America Center of Asia-Pacific Excellence (LatAm CAPE) is hosting the exhibition, in partnership with Te Awahou Nieuwe Stroom, from November 25, 2022 to January 29, 2023.

From la Milpa a la Mesa – A Mexican gastronomic journey
Mapuna Kabinet Art Gallery
From Friday 25 November 2022 to Sunday 29 January 2023

© Scoop Media

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Authentic Mexican cuisine joins downtown Gainesville’s foodie scene https://mexicalibluescafe.com/authentic-mexican-cuisine-joins-downtown-gainesvilles-foodie-scene/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 02:15:57 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/authentic-mexican-cuisine-joins-downtown-gainesvilles-foodie-scene/ November 10—Authentic Mexican cuisine, select cocktails and a unique dining experience come together under one roof in downtown Gainesville. Consuelo opened just off the square at 112 Bradford St., with an 80-seat dining room and 30-foot bar behind which more than 50 tequilas and mezcals await concoction. Among its varied menu, diners will find taquitos […]]]>

November 10—Authentic Mexican cuisine, select cocktails and a unique dining experience come together under one roof in downtown Gainesville.

Consuelo opened just off the square at 112 Bradford St., with an 80-seat dining room and 30-foot bar behind which more than 50 tequilas and mezcals await concoction.

Among its varied menu, diners will find taquitos de papa, flat taquitos stuffed with potatoes served with lettuce, fresh tomato salsa and queso fresco; carne en su jugo, sliced ​​braised flank steak, tomatillos, beans, bacon and chorizo; pozole verde, a seasonal broth with chicken, hominy and poblano; and, for dessert, empanadas dulces and arroz con leche.

Consuelo is named after the late grandmother of co-owner Pepe Perez, who displayed superb culinary skills and left behind a collection of beloved family recipes that were regularly savored around her dining room table of 16. squares.

“She was very classy and sophisticated and elegant, but at the same time she was able to walk into the kitchen, put on her apron and cook all day,” said Abigail Guzman, Perez’s wife and business partner.

The restaurant’s menu is curated from Consuelo’s recipe index, as well as Guzman and the couple’s mothers.

Gainesville residents for 10+ years, Pepe is from Guadalajara, Mexico, and Abigail is a first-generation Mexican-American. The couple also own Pristine Clean and Pristine Painting.

For Perez and Guzman, Consuelo is a longtime dream in the making — a dream that foodies in Gainesville have welcomed with open arms, Guzman said.

“We’ve longed for something like this for a long time and really felt Gainesville was ready for something a little different,” Guzman said. “We always had the vision – our concept, the floor plan, what we wanted to bring to a Mexican restaurant – and here it is.”

Dishes are prepared daily, Guzman said, from homemade cocktail syrups and serrano-infused tequilas to homemade tortillas and guacamole made to order.

Enchiladas verdes — corn tortillas, chicken, lettuce, cream, queso fresco and tomato sauce — and Consuelo’s mole, made with dried peppers, nuts, seeds and chocolate over braised chicken and rice, have up to ‘has been a favorite with customers,’ Guzman said. .

At Consuelo, guests are invited to sit down, sip and stay awhile, savoring an experience designed to feel like home.

“We really want people to sit down, have a cocktail, enjoy their dinner and stay as long as they want,” Guzman said. “We’re not trying to get anyone out of here. We as a family tend to spend up to four or five hours in a restaurant – that’s what we’re used to. C is important to us. People said, ‘I feel at home, I feel good here. We have a lot of Hispanic people (customers) who come and say, ‘It’s like I’m eating at my grandma’s house. I feel like I’m back home.’”

Customers can dine from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

Reservations, while not required, are recommended and can be made online through SeatOn or by calling 470-703-0300.

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Inside Princeton’s Free Food Mailing List https://mexicalibluescafe.com/inside-princetons-free-food-mailing-list/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 05:07:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/inside-princetons-free-food-mailing-list/ There’s nothing students love more than free food – and lots of it. At Princeton, the Free Food mailing list allows university affiliates to email information about where to find free food on campus, often after a catered event. The mailing list has been running for over a decade and has become an essential tool […]]]>

There’s nothing students love more than free food – and lots of it.

At Princeton, the Free Food mailing list allows university affiliates to email information about where to find free food on campus, often after a catered event. The mailing list has been running for over a decade and has become an essential tool for clubs and event organizers to distribute food that would otherwise go to waste.

The Daily Princetonian analyzed posts on the Free Food mailing list to find out when, where and what kind of food is being shared. Our dataset included all announcements from the Free Food mailing list from March 14 of this year – the lifting of the University’s mask mandate – until the end of the spring semester on May 15, as well as the publications throughout September 2022.

During these periods, there were a total of 298 emails to the Free Food mailing list. This range spans 93 days, or an average of 3.2 posts per day. The busiest days were Friday, May 6 and Friday, September 30, both of which saw 10 messages sent each day.

Similarly, posts on the Free Food mailing list have been concentrated towards the end of the weeks. Almost 30% of all messages were sent on a Friday, while only 5% were sent on a Sunday. The number of posts rose steadily throughout the week before dropping precipitously over the weekend, likely due to a decrease in college programs.

Analyzing when the messages were sent, it becomes apparent that most of the free food is shared in the afternoon and evening. 172 posts were made between 12 p.m. and 8 p.m., while only 10 announcements were made between 4 a.m. and 12 p.m.

The most popular time to post on the Free Food mailing list was between 6 and 7 p.m. April 23 announcing free chicken tenders at Campus Club.)

Pizza was the most popular mailing list giveaway, with over 16% of posts referencing pizza. Desserts were the second most popular category – defined as cakes, cookies, brownies and other treats – accounting for nearly 11% of posts. The next most popular categories were, in descending order: sandwiches, Asian cuisine, Mexican cuisine, catering with olives and Mediterranean cuisine (without olives).

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Food was primarily distributed in university buildings, accounting for 35% of messages on the mailing list. The remaining positions were split almost evenly between residential buildings, community spaces (such as the Carl A. Fields Center for Equality and Cultural Understanding, the Campus Club, and Whig Hall), and the Frist Campus Center.

The former was by far the most common space for posting mailing lists, with 65 posts. The second most popular place for free food was the Campus Club with 18 positions. The Fields Center, Friend Center, Louis A. Simpson International Building, Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building, and Whig Hall all had more than 10 positions.

Within Frist, the 100-level lounge space, home to Witherspoon’s and the campus parcel lockers, was the most popular spot for free food. If the Frist 100 level were its own separate building, it would have the second most positions of any building on campus, topped only by the rest of Frist.

In the buildings and residential areas of Princeton, most food was distributed to Butler College, which had 13 stations. Mathey and Rockefeller colleges were close behind with 12 positions each. Yeh College had the fewest number of positions because the dataset encompasses a period of time when Yeh was not occupied.

Of the other residential settings, only four articles referred to locations in upper-class housing, while three mentioned graduate housing, including Lakeside Graduate Housing, Lawrence Apartments and Graduate College.

Mathey, Rocky, and Butler had more free food offers than the other four residential colleges. (Yeh and New College West only opened in August 2022. First College closed this spring.)

If you’re ever on the hunt for free food on campus, your best bet is to refresh your inbox between 6 and 7 p.m. on Friday nights in hopes of grabbing some leftover pizza from Frist.

Ryan Konarska is a sophomore writer contributing to the data section of “The Prince”. Please address any request for correction to corrections@dailyprincetonian.com.

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It’s time for new approaches to the U.S.-Mexico corn trade https://mexicalibluescafe.com/its-time-for-new-approaches-to-the-u-s-mexico-corn-trade/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 22:31:28 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/its-time-for-new-approaches-to-the-u-s-mexico-corn-trade/ As the world reels from the latest supply chain disruption, there is a growing international movement to rebuild resilience by increasing domestic food production for local markets. This is the time to find new solutions; unfortunately, there is growing pressure on trade officials to lock in business as usual approaches in this new era. Trade […]]]>

As the world reels from the latest supply chain disruption, there is a growing international movement to rebuild resilience by increasing domestic food production for local markets. This is the time to find new solutions; unfortunately, there is growing pressure on trade officials to lock in business as usual approaches in this new era. Trade will always be part of a sustainable food supply. However, given the turmoil and supply disruptions in international markets in recent years, some countries are considering diversifying the sources and types of production needed to feed their people.

Mexico is one of these countries. When President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador took office in 2019, one of his first moves was to establish an official food self-sufficiency program. Early in his tenure, his administration announced a series of programs aimed at increasing local production (especially by smallholder farmers) at fair prices and shifting to more environmentally and health-friendly production methods. public. These initiatives included a plan announced in December 2020 to phase out the use and imports of glyphosate and GMO corn by 2024.

Recent pressure on the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) by US corn exporters has sounded the alarm over allegedly unfair restrictions on their sales to Mexico. They claim that the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) requires Mexico to approve goods produced using agricultural biotechnology – it does not. In fact, while the USMCA sets out a process for reviewing the approval of these goods, it also explicitly states that nothing in the agreement obliges countries to come to any conclusion.

Mexico has the sovereign right to determine the rules governing its food system. The United States has its own import restrictions to ensure food safety. The EU has restricted the production and imports of GMOs for decades, as have other countries around the world. Trade rules require that these processes not be arbitrary or unfairly discriminate against particular countries, but they must not be used to subvert public initiatives aimed at building countries’ ability to feed their nations more sustainably.

Despite claims by US corn exporters, Mexico does not ban imports. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which was replaced by the USMCA, required the Mexican government to phase out its corn tariff protections over 15 years. He actually accelerated that timeline, leading to a sharp increase in the export of cheap US corn (and other commodities) to Mexico at prices well below the cost of production. My organization, the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP), has been calculating dumping rates for corn, wheat, rice, soybeans, and cotton since the 1990s. During the first decade of NAFTA, maize was exported at an average of 15% below the cost of production. In 2017, the dumping rates were 9% for corn, 38% for wheat and 3% for rice.

According to calculations of census data by researchers at Mexico’s Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, some 4.9 million Mexican family farmers were displaced after NAFTA, of whom about 3 million became seasonal workers in industries. agro-exporters. This change was part of a dramatic reconfiguration of supply chains and a sharp increase in corporate concentration in agriculture in North America, as global companies moved different stages of production between countries to reduce costs. Fodder corn production by ever-larger farmers in Mexico has increased alongside corn imports from the United States, contributing to the vicious cycle of agricultural losses and corporate concentration that has hurt farmers in both countries.

The transition to greater national sufficiency in maize and other food supplies has been planned for years and clearly will not happen overnight. In the meantime, the Mexican government is exploring where it can buy corn that meets its needs. This could include purchases of non-GMO corn from the United States. The Non-GMO Project notes that in 2020, US farmers planted 7.49 million acres of corn produced without GMOs. U.S. producers who want to sell in Mexico could change their production methods before the planned transition in 2024 to satisfy consumers and Mexican laws.

Food supply disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, supply chain disruptions and growing climate chaos require new approaches. Mexico’s planned transition is one such response. The United States should learn from this type of initiative rather than redouble its efforts on the failures of agricultural and trade policies of the past.

Karen Hansen-Kuhn is Program Director at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, where she leads work to challenge free trade agreements as they relate to food and agricultural systems and advance agroecological solutions.

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Can you solve it? Brilliant Puzzles by the Wizard of Witty Word Games | Math https://mexicalibluescafe.com/can-you-solve-it-brilliant-puzzles-by-the-wizard-of-witty-word-games-math/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 08:25:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/can-you-solve-it-brilliant-puzzles-by-the-wizard-of-witty-word-games-math/ He is the sultan of contrepèteries and the Aga Khan of anagrams. Today’s word puzzles are defined by Frank Paul, a legend in the world of quizzes and puzzles. Paul is known to UK viewers as a champion of Only Connect and was co-host of Channel Four’s Answer Trap. He is also a fine artist, […]]]>

He is the sultan of contrepèteries and the Aga Khan of anagrams. Today’s word puzzles are defined by Frank Paul, a legend in the world of quizzes and puzzles.

Paul is known to UK viewers as a champion of Only Connect and was co-host of Channel Four’s Answer Trap. He is also a fine artist, the son of artists Celia Paul and Lucian Freud.

Paul is a genius in the field of word games. I hope you find the following puzzles as joyful as I do.

1. Counterpetries of money

A contrepèterie occurs when two consecutive words (or elements of the same word) exchange their initial letters or sounds. Rephrase the following sentences using a pair of double lines.

Example: delicate followers greet men from France. Answer: Frail henchmen salute the French

a) Hummus ingredients select a dairy product.

b) Orangutans and gorillas ate fruit that grew on the vines.

c) The meal brought to school had no impact.

d) Rodents suppress feline fury.

e) Infants make noise to fight illness.

2. Tri-anagrams

Rephrase each of the following sentences using three words that are anagrams of each other. The number of letters in the anagram is in parentheses.

Example: The most agile members of the clergy do not give up (7). Answer: The spriest priests persist

a) The present reptile expresses remorse (7)

b) Keeps the most unpleasant parts of the eyeballs (7)

c) An opera heroine adds toppings to Mexican food (5)

d) Removal of waste on the strongest fiber strands. (seven)

e) Companies that sell goods at a reduced price initiate price reduction proceedings. (ten)

3. Double blanks

Fill in the blanks in the following sentences. Each blank space contains the same sequence of letters, in the same order, although they may be punctuated differently or include spaces. The sentences are all coherent, so sometimes surreal!

Example: Children’s books should feature easy-to-read _______________ little animals and a charming atmosphere, and I believe we should _______________ any children’s author who explores more sinister themes, forcing them to explain themselves to a jury of outraged parents. Answer: the first blank is “prose, cute”, the second is “pursue”

a) Her fiancé left her shortly after her marriage proposal when he discovered that she had sold _______ to buy pickled _______

b) I was explaining, “The purpose of ________ is to store information,” when a student shouted, “I refuse to learn anything about biology that isn’t mentioned in the Book of ________!”

vs). My superstitious housemates, who keep wishing for what they presume is a shooting star only to find out it’s actually a _______________ their bad luck loudly as I try to sleep, lamenting that if it had been a shooting star, their dreams would have _______________ .

d) I strongly suspect that some members of the film crew whom I invited to my house stole Japanese food: it is surely no coincidence that as soon as the _______________ _______________, the sushi and the katsu curry have started to disappear.

e) “How should the light that disbelieved in refraction be _______________?” It should be thrown away prism!” As soon as I heard that _______________ tears of laughter.

I’ll be back with the answers at 5pm UK. SPO NOILERS, I mean NO SPOILERS!

Instead, please suggest your favorite counterfeit pairs and triple anagrams.

Frank Paul’s Twelve Christmas Quiz Photography: Oneworld Books

If you liked today’s puzzles, you’ll love Paul’s latest book, The Twelve Christmas Quiz, which comes out on Thursday. Alan Connor of this parish calls him a “21st Century Lewis Carroll”. You can pre-order at the Guardian Bookstore or other outlets.

I install a puzzle here every two weeks on a Monday. I’m always on the lookout for great puzzles. If you want to suggest one, write to me.

I give school lectures on math and puzzles (online and in person). If your school is interested, please contact us.

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End of era for the famous Santa Fe Plaza carnitas cart | Local News https://mexicalibluescafe.com/end-of-era-for-the-famous-santa-fe-plaza-carnitas-cart-local-news/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/end-of-era-for-the-famous-santa-fe-plaza-carnitas-cart-local-news/ There he is, walking down one of the streets surrounding the Plaza as he has done so many times over the past 40+ years. Nearby, a mouth-watering aroma of grilled meat, onions, peppers and spices wafts from an old-fashioned food cart as if inviting its owner back so he can get back to business. The […]]]>

There he is, walking down one of the streets surrounding the Plaza as he has done so many times over the past 40+ years.

Nearby, a mouth-watering aroma of grilled meat, onions, peppers and spices wafts from an old-fashioned food cart as if inviting its owner back so he can get back to business.

The man, Roque García, is something of a legendary figure in the Plaza, where he’s been cooking carnitas since 1984. Saturday was his last day.

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Avocado Surplus Drives 380,000 Fruit Distribution in Philadelphia https://mexicalibluescafe.com/avocado-surplus-drives-380000-fruit-distribution-in-philadelphia/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 22:30:52 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/avocado-surplus-drives-380000-fruit-distribution-in-philadelphia/ Comment this story Comment Avocados, the fruit known as “green gold” because of their ability to generate billions of dollars for growers, are apparently so plentiful right now that South American farmers are just giving them away. A Philadelphia nonprofit group on Wednesday handed out hundreds of thousands of lawyers to anyone who drove into […]]]>

Comment

Avocados, the fruit known as “green gold” because of their ability to generate billions of dollars for growers, are apparently so plentiful right now that South American farmers are just giving them away. A Philadelphia nonprofit group on Wednesday handed out hundreds of thousands of lawyers to anyone who drove into FDR Park and asked for a case.

The avocados came from growers in South America, most likely Peru, said Evan Ehlers, founder and executive director of Sharing Excess, a Philadelphia-based group that fights waste by delivering surplus food to people and businesses. organizations that need it most. The proceeds were initially secured by Farmlink Project, a California-based nonprofit group that was able to get its hands on about five truckloads of avocados that would otherwise have gone to waste. The group gave the fruit to Sharing Excess for distribution, Ehlers said.

The giveaway underscores the volatility of this year’s avocado market, in which America’s voracious appetite for the fruit, combined with lower production in Mexico, has led to significantly higher prices and an influx of lawyers from other countries, including Peru. When the market began to stabilize in July and August and yields from Mexico rose again, analysts suggested the market may have been flooded with junk avocados. But these are only speculations.

“We are able to handle that amount and, you know, we’ve been moving them all week. It started to get to a point where we’re saturating the organizations we normally distribute to, and we realized we probably had to do a lot of distribution on our own,” Ehlers said in a phone call from Philadelphia, where he had spent part of the morning driving a forklift.

Within hours, Sharing Excess distributed 230,000 avocados on Wednesday to everyone who showed up at the park, whatever their need. Part of the group’s mission, Ehlers said, is to de-stigmatize hunger, so the organization doesn’t require people to produce evidence of need. Earlier in the week, Ehlers added, Sharing Excess donated 150,000 avocados to food banks in the Philadelphia area. The group plans to distribute more avocados on Thursday.

At the start of the summer, the price of medium-sized Mexican avocados peaked at $87 per case, an increase of 180% over the previous year, said David Magaña, principal fruit and vegetable analyst at RaboResearch. Food and Agribusiness in Fresno, California. About 90% of the avocados imported into the United States come from Mexico, according to a RaboResearch report transmitted by Magaña.

As avocado prices rose in the first months of the year, restaurants and chefs were forced to respond. Chipotle has increased the prices of its menus. An artisanal condiment company in Los Angeles had to modify its avocado salsa recipe to accommodate the higher prices.

“Avocado prices are so high that it’s now a luxury for a customer to ask for an avocado in a daily meal,” Lazaro González, a chef in Toluca, Mexico, told Business Insider this summer.

But since then, avocado prices have normalized. A case of 48 medium-sized Mexican avocados now sells for about $30, down about 25% from a year ago, Magaña said. So what explains the wild fluctuations in just a few months?

A number of factors contributed to higher prices in the first half of 2022, Magaña said. But one of the main factors was, fundamentally, the nature of avocado production itself: the trees have alternate production, which means that in some years they simply produce less fruit. Last season was one of those years, Magaña said. For the first six months of 2022, he said, shipments of avocados from Mexico to the United States were down 25% from the previous year, although Magaña notes that 2021 was a year exceptionally fruitful for growers in Michoacán, where most Mexican avocados are grown. .

But there were other impacts as well. In February, the US Department of Agriculture banned all imports from Michoacán after a US inspector was allegedly threatened in Mexico. The ban only lasted a week, but it was followed two months later by a new policy in Texas that required secondary inspections of all commercial trucks and other vehicles entering the state. The inspections led to mile-long queues at the US-Mexico border crossing and forced some operators to destroy products destined for US markets.

So all of that combined with a lean year,” Magaña said, “we had very high prices.”

The good news, Magaña said, is that the current season for Mexican avocados is “looking good” and that, for the first time, avocados will not only come from Michoacán. Mexico and the United States reached an agreement last year to import avocados from the state of Jalisco. The first shipment of Jalisco avocados arrived in the United States in August.

But the increased yield and lower price of Mexican avocados could spell trouble for Peruvian farmers. Magaña said he had no specific idea why Peruvian growers might have given their avocados to Philadelphia. But he said Philly is a main port of entry for South American fruit. If the Peruvian fruit was not in optimal condition when it arrived, buyers may not be required, let alone compelled, to grab it, given that Mexican avocados are now widely available. (Interestingly, Australia also faces a glut of avocados.)

Farmlink Project did not immediately respond to an email requesting more information on how it secured lawyers.

During the Philadelphia giveaway on Wednesday, Sharing Excess employees inspected each case of avocados before distributing them, Ehlers said. Many of them were still a few days away from peak maturity. But even if there were some small imperfections, the lawyers were still better in the hands of the public than in a landfill, the executive director said.

“Forty percent of the food produced in the United States is wasted,” Ehlers said. “Whether we have an effective way to give back to communities, so we can have a much better society where we waste less and share more.

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Mariachi Bands Rekindle Faded Memories of Mexican Alzheimer’s Patients https://mexicalibluescafe.com/mariachi-bands-rekindle-faded-memories-of-mexican-alzheimers-patients/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 13:31:00 +0000 https://mexicalibluescafe.com/mariachi-bands-rekindle-faded-memories-of-mexican-alzheimers-patients/ MEXICO CITY, Oct 16 (Reuters) – Mariachi bands have long been a staple of Mexican culture, and their lively songs are now finding a new purpose: rekindling memories for people with Alzheimer’s disease. The Mexican Center for Alzheimer’s Disease is promoting the therapy, hoping the music will awaken memories of the past in patients with […]]]>

MEXICO CITY, Oct 16 (Reuters) – Mariachi bands have long been a staple of Mexican culture, and their lively songs are now finding a new purpose: rekindling memories for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

The Mexican Center for Alzheimer’s Disease is promoting the therapy, hoping the music will awaken memories of the past in patients with the degenerative disease, encouraging them to sing or even dance to old, familiar tunes.

“It makes me very sad, because I remember my husband, but apart from that, I listen to music with joy because it brings back a lot of memories that make me very happy,” said Leonor Camacho, 90. Alzheimer’s disease. in Mexico.

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Songs with connections to her husband, relatives and friends are played at Camacho to supplement her daily therapy, which includes saying tongue twisters with other patients online and performing manual exercises to boost her memory.

The therapy course led by guitarists, violinists and trumpeters in short jackets and baggy sombreros began in September and will run through mid-November, encompassing performances across the city that patients can attend.

The shows take place in ballrooms, boats on the waterways of the southern district of Xochimilco and the capital’s traditional mariachi hotspot, the central Plaza Garibaldi square, in hopes the venues will rekindle patient memories. .

Regina Altena, director of the Alzheimer’s Center, said studies show music stimulates neurotransmitters in the brain, creating a mental and emotional connection that helps patients remember and reminisce about important events in their lives.

Originally developed in Germany 11 years ago, the therapy has been given a mariachi twist to adapt it for Mexican use.

Camacho, who has had Alzheimer’s disease for five years, is one of approximately 1.8 million people with dementia in Mexico. Among them, about 1.3 million would be suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

During the afternoons, Camacho enjoys browsing photo albums with his daughter Maria del Rocio Maya and keeps his mind active by preparing food and doing other chores around his house.

Since Camacho began mariachi therapy, Maria del Rocio said her mother has become more lively and has resumed a more active role in family life. Before, Camacho tended to sit alone in an armchair by the window, her daughter said.

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Editing by Dave Graham and David Gregorio

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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